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Every Popular Fish—Ranked for Nutritional Benefits

Eat This, Not That! Logo By © Provided by Eat This, Not That! of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 47: <p>By Olivia Tarantino</p><p>Give a man a fish, and he will eat for a day. Teach a man what kind of fish to eat, and he will eat healthily for a lifetime.</p><p>Health experts have long touted the nutritional benefits of fish: These sea creatures rank high on lists of the best sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, high-quality protein, <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/best-ways-to-speed-up-your-metabolism">metabolism-friendly</a> selenium, energy-boosting Vitamin B12, and inflammation-fighting Vitamin D. But even though eating fish is highly recommended, choosing which fish to eat can be more difficult than navigating a rowboat in a stormy sea. </p><p>When you buy fish, it can be tricky to balance your healthy eating ambitions with your concerns about your heart health and mercury levels—not to mention sustainable fishing practices or ocean health. Omega-3s are essential nutrients that help ward off heart disease, diabetes, and metabolism-slowing inflammation, and they’re primarily found in fish. Unfortunately, another element primarily found in fish is mercury. </p><p>Human exposure to mercury is mostly through seafood consumption, and this exposure has been found to cause adverse neurodevelopmental, cardiovascular, and immunological health effects in sufficient doses, according to studies in NeuroToxicology, Journal of Pediatrics, and Environmental Research. The FDA considers that the 1,000 parts per billion (ppb) limit provides an adequate margin of safety for adult men and women, and environmental advocacy groups like the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) recommend pregnant women or <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/get-in-the-mood-have-better-sex-healthy-foods">women planning to become pregnant</a> should avoid eating fish highest in mercury at 500 ppb and over. </p><p>To determine the best fish, we compiled a list of popular seafood consumed in the U.S., and we left off endangered species like Atlantic bluefin tuna. <strong>Because essential omega-3s and lean protein are two of the most uniquely valuable nutrients provided by fish, we chose to rank the seafood based on these nutritional benefits over standard methods of calories or fat. We also used nutritional perks like selenium, vitamin B12, and vitamin D to break any ties. Using the USDA Nutrient Database, we calculated the omega-3 (DHA and EPA) and protein content of each raw fish for a standard size of 3 ounces. The rankings also factored in potentially toxic levels of mercury from the Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Hg (mercury) Database in ppb as well as the fish’s source—whether wild or farmed using questionable techniques.</strong> Read on to find out which fish are keepers and which you should throw back. And then be sure to see the <a href="http://www.zerobelly.com/20-zero-belly-superfoods-youre-not-eating">20 Weight-Loss Superfoods You’re Not Eating</a>!</p>

Every Popular Fish—Ranked for Nutritional Benefits!

Give a man a fish, and he will eat for a day. Teach a man what kind of fish to eat, and he will eat healthily for a lifetime.

Health experts have long touted the nutritional benefits of fish: These sea creatures rank high on lists of the best sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, high-quality protein, metabolism-friendly selenium, energy-boosting Vitamin B12, and inflammation-fighting Vitamin D. But even though eating fish is highly recommended, choosing which fish to eat can be more difficult than navigating a rowboat in a stormy sea.

When you buy fish, it can be tricky to balance your healthy eating ambitions with your concerns about your heart health and mercury levels—not to mention sustainable fishing practices or ocean health. Omega-3s are essential nutrients that help ward off heart disease, diabetes, and metabolism-slowing inflammation, and they’re primarily found in fish. Unfortunately, another element primarily found in fish is mercury.

Human exposure to mercury is mostly through seafood consumption, and this exposure has been found to cause adverse neurodevelopmental, cardiovascular, and immunological health effects in sufficient doses, according to studies in NeuroToxicology, Journal of Pediatrics, and Environmental Research. The FDA considers that the 1,000 parts per billion (ppb) limit provides an adequate margin of safety for adult men and women, and environmental advocacy groups like the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) recommend pregnant women or women planning to become pregnant should avoid eating fish highest in mercury at 500 ppb and over.

To determine the best fish, we compiled a list of popular seafood consumed in the U.S., and we left off endangered species like Atlantic bluefin tuna. Because essential omega-3s and lean protein are two of the most uniquely valuable nutrients provided by fish, we chose to rank the seafood based on these nutritional benefits over standard methods of calories or fat. We also used nutritional perks like selenium, vitamin B12, and vitamin D to break any ties. Using the USDA Nutrient Database, we calculated the omega-3 (DHA and EPA) and protein content of each raw fish for a standard size of 3 ounces.

The rankings also factored in potentially toxic levels of mercury from the Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Hg (mercury) Database in ppb as well as the fish’s source—whether wild or farmed using questionable techniques. Read on to find out which fish are keepers and which you should throw back. And then be sure to see the 20 weight-loss superfoods you’re not eating.

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