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Here's how much sugar is really in your favorite condiments

INSIDER Logo By Cameron Evans of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 17:  You're probably not thinking about how much sugar you're adding to your food when you reach for a bottle of ketchup, Sriracha, or barbecue sauce. Condiments don't count, right?  Unfortunately, the sugar (and calories) in condiments can really add up if you're not cautious about the amount you're using. And it's easy to overdo it."Condiments aren't something that people use sparingly and many people don't think about serving sizes," registered dietitian-nutritionist Brigitte Zeitlin told INSIDER.  Additionally,  sugar can be disguised under many names such as high-fructose corn syrup, molasses, dextrose, fructose, honey, maltose, and glucose, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  To keep the amount of sugar you're eating in check, try measuring your condiments. If you're at a restaurant, Zeitlin suggested getting all of your dressings and sauces on the side and then measuring them with your spoon, which is typically slightly smaller than a tablespoon. Reading nutrition labels and knowing the ingredients can also help prevent you from overdoing it. Here's how much sugar is really in your favorite condiments.

You're probably not thinking about how much sugar you're adding to your food when you reach for a bottle of ketchup, Sriracha, or barbecue sauce. Condiments don't count, right?

Unfortunately, the sugar (and calories) in condiments can really add up if you're not cautious about the amount you're using. And it's easy to overdo it.

"Condiments aren't something that people use sparingly and many people don't think about serving sizes," registered dietitian-nutritionist Brigitte Zeitlin told INSIDER.

Additionally, sugar can be disguised under many names such as high-fructose corn syrup, molasses, dextrose, fructose, honey, maltose, and glucose, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

To keep the amount of sugar you're eating in check, try measuring your condiments. If you're at a restaurant, Zeitlin suggested getting all of your dressings and sauces on the side and then measuring them with your spoon, which is typically slightly smaller than a tablespoon.

Reading nutrition labels and knowing the ingredients can also help prevent you from overdoing it. Here's how much sugar is really in your favorite condiments.

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