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Is McDonald's Coffee Really Too Hot? Two New Lawsuits Say Yes

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Steven John of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 6: In late February of 1992, a 79-year-old woman named Stella Liebeck ordered a 49-cent cup of coffee from a McDonald's restaurant in Albuquerque, N.M. That beverage would turn out to be the costliest cup of coffee the chain had ever sold. Until, perhaps, now.Liebeck suffered severe burns when the dangerously hot coffee spilled onto her lap, injuries that would lead to a lawsuit with a multi-million dollar settlement. (Though the amount was subsequently reduced and the matter closed in a private settlement.) It was also largely derided as a frivolous case that had inspired countless personal injury lawsuits against major corporations, many of which were, indeed, without merit.But a close review of the facts of Liebeck's suit shows it was far from frivolous—McDonald's coffee had already been known to cause serious injury when spilled, yet the company had taken no action to protect its customers. And it seems that the chain still hasn't taken proper steps to solve the issue: despite the fact that McDonald's has already lost several lawsuits over hot coffee burns, there are now two recent new cases filed.For more, check out McDonald's, Subway, and More Are Expected to Be Investigated By the FTC.Read the full article at Eat This, Not That!

Is McDonald's Coffee Really Too Hot? Two New Lawsuits Say Yes

In late February of 1992, a 79-year-old woman named Stella Liebeck ordered a 49-cent cup of coffee from a McDonald's restaurant in Albuquerque, N.M. That beverage would turn out to be the costliest cup of coffee the chain had ever sold. Until, perhaps, now.

Liebeck suffered severe burns when the dangerously hot coffee spilled onto her lap, injuries that would lead to a lawsuit with a multi-million dollar settlement. (Though the amount was subsequently reduced and the matter closed in a private settlement.) It was also largely derided as a frivolous case that had inspired countless personal injury lawsuits against major corporations, many of which were, indeed, without merit.

But a close review of the facts of Liebeck's suit shows it was far from frivolous—McDonald's coffee had already been known to cause serious injury when spilled, yet the company had taken no action to protect its customers. And it seems that the chain still hasn't taken proper steps to solve the issue: despite the fact that McDonald's has already lost several lawsuits over hot coffee burns, there are now two recent new cases filed.

For more, check out McDonald's, Subway, and More Are Expected to Be Investigated By the FTC.

Read the full article at Eat This, Not That!

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