You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The Best and Worst Store-Bought Broth & Stock Brands—Ranked!

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Carlene Thomas, RDN of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 12: Broth and stock have always been pantry staples, but that doesn't mean they should be overlooked when it comes to upgrading your diet. Oftentimes, store-bought stocks and broths are loaded with sodium and are secretly hiding sketchy ingredients. If you're looking to overhaul your diet and pantry, you should start with the best healthy stocks and broths—and we have just the picks for you.First, what's the difference between stock and broth?While broth and stock are super similar, they're technically not the same thing.Stock is made when you typically simmer bones, some root veggies (typically onion, carrot, and celery), and some herbs with water. Sometimes, the bones are roasted first to make a stock with more flavor depth and the mixture is simmered for several hours. There's no seasoning added beyond that because in the kitchen you'd use stock for anything from soups to sauces in tons of recipes. Stocks are used to build other recipes and if you're starting off with a highly seasoned stock, you can do fewer things with it.Broth is like stock but is cooked way less and is usually seasoned. It's used in the same way, but it's less rich and can also be sipped on its own (that's why bone broth is so popular).If you want to get down to the nitty-gritty, stock technically provides more nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and collagen, which are all released from the bones when stock is cooked. But in general, stock and broth are pretty close in nutrition at their nutrition baseline. The big difference comes from the quality of ingredients and sodium content.Making broth or stock at home is a great way to avoid food waste, but there are lots of store-bought options available. Read on for tips on picking the best stock and to see our top choices for grabbing one off the shelves. Plus, if you don't feel like making soup, here are The Best & Worst Chicken Soups on the Shelves—Ranked! Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

The Best and Worst Store-Bought Broth & Stock Brands—Ranked!

Broth and stock have always been pantry staples, but that doesn't mean they should be overlooked when it comes to upgrading your diet. Oftentimes, store-bought stocks and broths are loaded with sodium and are secretly hiding sketchy ingredients. If you're looking to overhaul your diet and pantry, you should start with the best healthy stocks and broths—and we have just the picks for you.

First, what's the difference between stock and broth?

While broth and stock are super similar, they're technically not the same thing.

Stock is made when you typically simmer bones, some root veggies (typically onion, carrot, and celery), and some herbs with water. Sometimes, the bones are roasted first to make a stock with more flavor depth and the mixture is simmered for several hours. There's no seasoning added beyond that because in the kitchen you'd use stock for anything from soups to sauces in tons of recipes. Stocks are used to build other recipes and if you're starting off with a highly seasoned stock, you can do fewer things with it.

Broth is like stock but is cooked way less and is usually seasoned. It's used in the same way, but it's less rich and can also be sipped on its own (that's why bone broth is so popular).

If you want to get down to the nitty-gritty, stock technically provides more nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and collagen, which are all released from the bones when stock is cooked. But in general, stock and broth are pretty close in nutrition at their nutrition baseline. The big difference comes from the quality of ingredients and sodium content.

Making broth or stock at home is a great way to avoid food waste, but there are lots of store-bought options available. Read on for tips on picking the best stock and to see our top choices for grabbing one off the shelves. Plus, if you don't feel like making soup, here are The Best & Worst Chicken Soups on the Shelves—Ranked!

 

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

© Provided by Eat This, Not That!

More from Eat This, Not That!

Eat This, Not That!
Eat This, Not That!
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon