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The Secret Effects of Drinking Green Tea

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Erin Yarnall of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 2 of 5: There are a lot of things we know not to do to avoid our risk of getting cancer—don't smoke, protect yourself from the sun, and avoid cancer-causing chemicals. But there are also some things that you can do to help avoid cancer, including drinking green tea.According to a study published by the journal BioFactors, participants who drank 10 or more cups of green tea a day showed a "decreased relative risk of cancer incidence." Drinking green tea also helps lower the risk of heart disease, according to the same study.10 cups a day—isn't that a lot? A typical 8 oz. cup of green tea contains 35 milligrams of caffeine. This means 10 cups of green tea would equate to 350 milligrams of caffeine, which is still under the U.S Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recommended daily limit of 400 milligrams a day.If you plan on adding green tea into your routine, instead of brewing individual cups, make a pitcher of unsweetened iced green tea to have in your fridge when you're ready for a drink.

1. It can reduce your risk of cancer.

There are a lot of things we know not to do to avoid our risk of getting cancer—don't smoke, protect yourself from the sun, and avoid cancer-causing chemicals. But there are also some things that you can do to help avoid cancer, including drinking green tea.

According to a study published by the journal BioFactors, participants who drank 10 or more cups of green tea a day showed a "decreased relative risk of cancer incidence." Drinking green tea also helps lower the risk of heart disease, according to the same study.

10 cups a day—isn't that a lot? A typical 8 oz. cup of green tea contains 35 milligrams of caffeine. This means 10 cups of green tea would equate to 350 milligrams of caffeine, which is still under the U.S Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recommended daily limit of 400 milligrams a day.

If you plan on adding green tea into your routine, instead of brewing individual cups, make a pitcher of unsweetened iced green tea to have in your fridge when you're ready for a drink.

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