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We Tried 5 Turkey Burgers and This Is the Best

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Su-Jit Lin of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 6: Remember when your only options for burgers were ham- or cheese? Yeah, it's unimaginable to us, too, as relic-like as those mythical "before the Internet" days. When it comes to summertime grilling now, there are a wealth of options. In beef alone, you can choose from different fat levels; various cuts; grass- or grain-fed; onions and cheese in the blend—the list goes on and on. Then there's chicken, salmon, bison, plant-based options, and of course, the gateway meat to this whole burger revolution: the turkey burger.Invented by Cornell Corporation Board Member Robert C. Baker, whose other contributions toward modern-day staples include chicken nuggets (can you believe these didn't exist until 1963?!), turkey has become a go-to first step for those looking to take a healthier approach to their all-American diets. In fact, it was such a popular move that between 2015 and 2017, demand and consumption increased by 20% in limited-service restaurants!Now, whether this is actually a healthier swap comes down to the patties you buy. Nutritionally, side by side, the turkey burger's profile isn't too far off from beef's—part of what's made it such a natural swap. Sure, you sacrifice a little protein, iron, and zinc from the red meat choice, but you get more B vitamins for energy metabolism, fewer calories per average serving in most cases, and less saturated fat. Of course, these comparisons are moot if you get 90% lean ground beef or buy turkey burgers with dark meat and skin in the blend instead of premium lean all-white meat turkey burgers.That said, turkey burgers are a smart choice if you have a hard time processing red meat or prefer the taste of poultry, and—most importantly—want to bring home the good stuff. And this taste test is how we can help you do the latter.We selected five widely available, national brand, all-white-meat varieties of simply seasoned low-fat frozen turkey patties and grilled them simultaneously on a countertop George Foreman grill. All were cook-from-frozen types for convenience, and we tried them first plain and hot, then with simple classic burger toppings like American cheese, ketchup, lettuce, tomato, and sliced red onion on Dave's Multigrain rolls to see how they played with others.Without further ado, let's talk some real turkey. And if you're craving something hot, check out We Tasted 10 Chicken Noodle Soups and This Is the Best.Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

We Tried 5 Turkey Burgers and This Is the Best

Remember when your only options for burgers were ham- or cheese? Yeah, it's unimaginable to us, too, as relic-like as those mythical "before the Internet" days. When it comes to summertime grilling now, there are a wealth of options. In beef alone, you can choose from different fat levels; various cuts; grass- or grain-fed; onions and cheese in the blend—the list goes on and on. Then there's chicken, salmon, bison, plant-based options, and of course, the gateway meat to this whole burger revolution: the turkey burger.

Invented by Cornell Corporation Board Member Robert C. Baker, whose other contributions toward modern-day staples include chicken nuggets (can you believe these didn't exist until 1963?!), turkey has become a go-to first step for those looking to take a healthier approach to their all-American diets. In fact, it was such a popular move that between 2015 and 2017, demand and consumption increased by 20% in limited-service restaurants!

Now, whether this is actually a healthier swap comes down to the patties you buy. Nutritionally, side by side, the turkey burger's profile isn't too far off from beef's—part of what's made it such a natural swap. Sure, you sacrifice a little protein, iron, and zinc from the red meat choice, but you get more B vitamins for energy metabolism, fewer calories per average serving in most cases, and less saturated fat. Of course, these comparisons are moot if you get 90% lean ground beef or buy turkey burgers with dark meat and skin in the blend instead of premium lean all-white meat turkey burgers.

That said, turkey burgers are a smart choice if you have a hard time processing red meat or prefer the taste of poultry, and—most importantly—want to bring home the good stuff. And this taste test is how we can help you do the latter.

We selected five widely available, national brand, all-white-meat varieties of simply seasoned low-fat frozen turkey patties and grilled them simultaneously on a countertop George Foreman grill. All were cook-from-frozen types for convenience, and we tried them first plain and hot, then with simple classic burger toppings like American cheese, ketchup, lettuce, tomato, and sliced red onion on Dave's Multigrain rolls to see how they played with others.

Without further ado, let's talk some real turkey. And if you're craving something hot, check out We Tasted 10 Chicken Noodle Soups and This Is the Best.

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

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