You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

If You're Depressed Now, It Can Wreak Havoc on Your Brain Later

ETNT Mind+Body Logo By John Anderer of ETNT Mind+Body | Slide 2 of 5: Study authors report that depression in early adulthood, independent of depression during other life stages, appears to have a detrimental effect on cognition and thinking skills for the remainder of a person's life.Even just 10 years later, individuals who were depressed at 25 were more likely to show diminished cognition by age 35. Moreover, those same individuals were more likely to experience full-blown cognitive decline by the time old age arrived.Among a collection of roughly 6,000 older adults, researchers discovered that those who reported wrestling with depression during early adulthood were 73% more likely to experience cognitive impairment in old age. Similarly, elderly adults who dealt with depression in middle to late adulthood were also 43% more likely to report cognitive impairment in old age.All in all, the research team concludes that depression in early adulthood appears to predict dementia onset decades later. Meanwhile, maintaining a certain degree of positivity during your 20s and 30s seems to hold a protective effect against late-life cognitive decline.Related: Sign up for our newsletter for the latest Mind + Body news!

Depression and dementia have a long-term relationship

Study authors report that depression in early adulthood, independent of depression during other life stages, appears to have a detrimental effect on cognition and thinking skills for the remainder of a person's life.

Even just 10 years later, individuals who were depressed at 25 were more likely to show diminished cognition by age 35. Moreover, those same individuals were more likely to experience full-blown cognitive decline by the time old age arrived.

Among a collection of roughly 6,000 older adults, researchers discovered that those who reported wrestling with depression during early adulthood were 73% more likely to experience cognitive impairment in old age. Similarly, elderly adults who dealt with depression in middle to late adulthood were also 43% more likely to report cognitive impairment in old age.

All in all, the research team concludes that depression in early adulthood appears to predict dementia onset decades later. Meanwhile, maintaining a certain degree of positivity during your 20s and 30s seems to hold a protective effect against late-life cognitive decline.

Related: Sign up for our newsletter for the latest Mind + Body news!

© Provided by Eat This, Not That!

More from ETNT Mind+Body

ETNT Mind+Body
ETNT Mind+Body
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon