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Thinning Hair, Dandruff, Graying, and More: 16 Hair Mysteries Explained

Reader's Digest Logo By Kristine Solomon of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 16: If you notice a gradual reduction in the overall volume of your hair—but you don't notice an unusual amount of hair fallout—it's probably androgenic alopecia. Androgenic alopecia is commonly known as male pattern baldness—but it occurs frequently in women as well. It happens when hair follicles on the scalp develop a sensitivity to adrogens, a male hormone. This type of hair loss is largely genetic and is relating to aging, says Anabel Kingsley, renowned trichologist. You'll probably find that the hair shaft itself becomes thinner too, as follicles are gradually shrinking. Kingsley says this type of hair thinning is the most difficult to treat, but a topical or oral medication can prevent further hair loss. Regrowth is possible, she says, but not in everyone; it simply depends on the person. Changes in your hair can offer subtle clues to other things going on in your body. Here are all the things your hair is trying to tell you about your health.

Gradually thinning hair

If you notice a gradual reduction in the overall volume of your hair—but you don't notice an unusual amount of hair fallout—it's probably androgenic alopecia. Androgenic alopecia is commonly known as male pattern baldness—but it occurs frequently in women as well. It happens when hair follicles on the scalp develop a sensitivity to adrogens, a male hormone. This type of hair loss is largely genetic and is relating to aging, says Anabel Kingsley, renowned trichologist. You'll probably find that the hair shaft itself becomes thinner too, as follicles are gradually shrinking. Kingsley says this type of hair thinning is the most difficult to treat, but a topical or oral medication can prevent further hair loss. Regrowth is possible, she says, but not in everyone; it simply depends on the person. Changes in your hair can offer subtle clues to other things going on in your body. Here are all the things your hair is trying to tell you about your health.
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