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Wearing These Just Before Bed Could Help You Sleep, Study Finds

Best Life Logo By John Quinn of Best Life | Slide 1 of 6: There's a one in four chance that you'll develop insomnia this year, according to recent research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Around 75 percent of people with insomnia recover without it developing into a persistent problem, the researchers note, but that doesn't mean it'll go away on its own. With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warning that a lack of sleep is linked to everything from type 2 diabetes and heart disease to obesity and depression, as well as workplace mistakes and automobile accidents, your sleep is an even more important issue than you might realize. To help ensure you get some shut-eye, you may want to consider slipping one accessory on in particular before bed. New research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology has found that your sleep can be improved by blue-light glasses. Read on to learn more, and for the bad habits to avoid, here's What You're Doing That Would Horrify Sleep Doctors.The researchers collected data from 63 managers and found that "wearing blue-light filtering glasses is an effective intervention to improve physiological (sleep), attitudinal (work engagement), and behavioral (task performance, organizational citizenship behavior, and counterproductive work behavior) outcomes."You may have heard about people wearing blue-light glasses while looking at the computer all day, but their ability to help you get some rest is a new development. "Wearing blue-light-filtering glasses creates a form of physiologic darkness, thus improving both sleep quantity and quality," study co-author Cristiano L. Guarana, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business, said in a statement.The truth is, blue light is an unavoidable factor in modern life. As an article by Harvard Health explains, humans previously lived in a state where we were lit only by the sun and developed a biological clock—or circadian rhythm—in response. The length of this rhythm varies for each of us, but it is usually around the 24-hour mark (longer for night owls, shorter for early risers). Daylight keeps us aligned with that rhythm, while artificial light can disrupt it. And artificial light with shorter blue wavelengths—which boost attention and suppress the production of sleep hormone melatonin—is especially bad at night. The Harvard researchers even found that blue light suppressed melatonin for twice as long as green light.Blue light is particularly given off by personal electronic devices like laptops, tablets, and smartphones. With the amount of time we are spending on these devices having increased throughout 2020 by as much as two hours per day, anyone struggling to sleep should look at reducing their exposure to blue light—and some new specs could be just the ticket.Read on for more tips on getting some shut-eye, and be sure to ignore these 25 Myths About Sleep That Are Keeping You Up at Night.Read the original article on Best Life.

Wearing These Just Before Bed Could Help You Sleep, Study Finds

There's a one in four chance that you'll develop insomnia this year, according to recent research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Around 75 percent of people with insomnia recover without it developing into a persistent problem, the researchers note, but that doesn't mean it'll go away on its own. With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warning that a lack of sleep is linked to everything from type 2 diabetes and heart disease to obesity and depression, as well as workplace mistakes and automobile accidents, your sleep is an even more important issue than you might realize. To help ensure you get some shut-eye, you may want to consider slipping one accessory on in particular before bed. New research published in the Journal of Applied Psychology has found that your sleep can be improved by blue-light glasses. Read on to learn more, and for the bad habits to avoid, here's What You're Doing That Would Horrify Sleep Doctors.

The researchers collected data from 63 managers and found that "wearing blue-light filtering glasses is an effective intervention to improve physiological (sleep), attitudinal (work engagement), and behavioral (task performance, organizational citizenship behavior, and counterproductive work behavior) outcomes."

You may have heard about people wearing blue-light glasses while looking at the computer all day, but their ability to help you get some rest is a new development. "Wearing blue-light-filtering glasses creates a form of physiologic darkness, thus improving both sleep quantity and quality," study co-author Cristiano L. Guarana, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business, said in a statement.

The truth is, blue light is an unavoidable factor in modern life. As an article by Harvard Health explains, humans previously lived in a state where we were lit only by the sun and developed a biological clock—or circadian rhythm—in response. The length of this rhythm varies for each of us, but it is usually around the 24-hour mark (longer for night owls, shorter for early risers). Daylight keeps us aligned with that rhythm, while artificial light can disrupt it. And artificial light with shorter blue wavelengths—which boost attention and suppress the production of sleep hormone melatonin—is especially bad at night. The Harvard researchers even found that blue light suppressed melatonin for twice as long as green light.

Blue light is particularly given off by personal electronic devices like laptops, tablets, and smartphones. With the amount of time we are spending on these devices having increased throughout 2020 by as much as two hours per day, anyone struggling to sleep should look at reducing their exposure to blue light—and some new specs could be just the ticket.

Read on for more tips on getting some shut-eye, and be sure to ignore these 25 Myths About Sleep That Are Keeping You Up at Night.

Read the original article on Best Life.

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