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Winnie Harlow Had the Best Response When a Fan Made an Ignorant Comment About Her Vitiligo

Health.com logo Health.com 11/23/2018 Samantha Lauriello

Chantelle Brown-Young wearing a hat © Provided by TIME Inc. Winnie Harlow recently became the first model with vitiligo to walk in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, bringing some long overdue awareness to this skin condition. Yet some people still don’t fully understand vitiligo and are, well, confused about the white patches on Harlow’s body.

Case in point: one comment Harlow received after she recently uploaded a photo of herself wearing metallic blue shorts but no shirt, revealing the white splotchy skin on her torso and arms. She looked as fierce as ever, but that’s beside the point.

“Who’s the designer of the shirt?” a fan wrote. Uh, what shirt? You mean her skin?

And Harlow had the best response: “God..?” she replied. You tell ‘em, girl.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by @ commentsbycelebs on Nov 14, 2018 at 8:36am PST

Vitiligo certainly isn’t designed by any high-end fashion label, but the uniqueness it can bring to a person’s skin is so beautiful that it looks like it could be.

In reality, vitiligo is a disorder that causes pigment-free patches of skin to appear randomly all over the body. It happens when the cells that normally produce pigment, melanocytes, are destroyed. The cause of vitiligo is unknown, but for most people, the condition manifests before they turn 30. Some experts believe it may be an autoimmune disease.

RELATED: Winnie Harlow Just Became the First Model With Vitiligo to Walk in the VS Fashion Show and We’re So Here for It

As funny as Harlow’s response was to that user’s comment, it’s understandable that someone who hasn’t been exposed to vitiligo would be confused by it. That’s exactly why we need to follow Harlow’s example and do our part to raise awareness.

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