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These are the most 'annoying' slang words, according to Americans

INSIDER Logo By Gianluca Russo of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 11: 
  
    A new study ranked the most
    annoying slang words, as well as those that are most confusing
    and most popular.
  
  
    Among the most annoying slang
    words analyzed were G.O.A.T., bae, hangry, Gucci, and
    ghost.
  
  
    Slang is often derived from
    drag, queer, and black culture before hitting the
    mainstream.
  
  
    Visit INSIDER's homepage for more
    stories.
  

  As time goes on, the English
  language continues to evolve and change. New words are added to
  the dictionary every year, many of which reflect the current
  lingo. But before a word becomes official and makes it into the
  dictionary, it often starts off as a slang word. A
  
  survey by polling company
  OnePoll analyzed the most popular - and most
  "annoying" - slang words currently used, according to participants, and among them
  are terms like "G.O.A.T." and "Bae."

  It's important to note that slang
  words play an integral part in language, especially when it comes
  to verbal language and on social media. Much of this language
  originates from smaller, often marginalized communities before
  hitting the mainstream. Some of the examples below, for instance,
  are derived from drag and queer culture, while others have
  origins in communities of color. Before it hits the mainstream,
  it's often used as a way to unite those in marginalized groups.
  

  "It confirms that we're
  together and it confirms that you're not one of us," Jonathon
  Green, a scholar in slang language, said in
  an interview with Time magazine. "Again, a human phenomenon.
  We want to put our arms around each other, as an element of
  self-defense."

  Once these words are picked up by a wider audience, they are
  often used to death, and often are used incorrectly, which may
  have something to do with peoples' level of annoyance. 

  With all that being said, we broke down the top 10 "most
  annoying" slang terms, according to those polled, and gave
  examples for "correct use." We tried to cite origins where we
  could, but as Green pointed out in Time magazine, language is
  fluid.

  • A new study ranked the most annoying slang words, as well as those that are most confusing and most popular.
  • Among the most annoying slang words analyzed were G.O.A.T., bae, hangry, Gucci, and ghost.
  • Slang is often derived from drag, queer, and black culture before hitting the mainstream.
  • Visit INSIDER's homepage for more stories.

As time goes on, the English language continues to evolve and change. New words are added to the dictionary every year, many of which reflect the current lingo. But before a word becomes official and makes it into the dictionary, it often starts off as a slang word. A survey by polling company OnePoll analyzed the most popular - and most "annoying" - slang words currently used, according to participants, and among them are terms like "G.O.A.T." and "Bae."

It's important to note that slang words play an integral part in language, especially when it comes to verbal language and on social media. Much of this language originates from smaller, often marginalized communities before hitting the mainstream. Some of the examples below, for instance, are derived from drag and queer culture, while others have origins in communities of color. Before it hits the mainstream, it's often used as a way to unite those in marginalized groups.

"It confirms that we're together and it confirms that you're not one of us," Jonathon Green, a scholar in slang language, said in an interview with Time magazine. "Again, a human phenomenon. We want to put our arms around each other, as an element of self-defense."

Once these words are picked up by a wider audience, they are often used to death, and often are used incorrectly, which may have something to do with peoples' level of annoyance.

With all that being said, we broke down the top 10 "most annoying" slang terms, according to those polled, and gave examples for "correct use." We tried to cite origins where we could, but as Green pointed out in Time magazine, language is fluid.

© Jerritt Clark/Getty Images

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