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What divorce rates were the year you were born

Stacker Logo By Alyssa Evans of Stacker | Slide 1 of 98: Divorce stems from the Latin word “divertere,” which means “to turn aside.” Unfortunately, for most, it isn’t quite that simple. Divorces can be a long, arduous process that takes months or even years. Crying children, legal fees, and bitter fights over silverware are the tropes that frequently come to mind when discussing divorce, and it’s perhaps those stigmas that are contributing to an overall decrease in divorce rates in the 21st century.It could also be that marriages are, generally, occurring later in life. In one study, the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the chances of remaining married by the respondents 46th birthday were over 20% higher for couples who married between the ages of 29-34 compared to those who wed at ages 15-22, and studies show that the average age Americans tie the knot is steadily growing older and older. The gap narrows with closer age groups: 57.6% of couples who married at ages 23-28 were still together at their 46th birthday, compared to 65.2% for those aged 29-34.Although divorce rates are generally falling, a CBS poll conducted in 2014 revealed 64% of Americans felt the average American family is weaker than when they were a child. Oh joy.So what do the numbers say? Stacker compiled data from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) gathered by Randal Olson, as well as national marriage and divorce rates from 2000-2016 and Statista data about the national divorce rates from 1990-2016. The divorce rate was taken by dividing the overall population of the United States in a specific year by the number of divorces that occurred that year.So how has our propensity for divorce changed over the years? Read on to see the divorce rate the year you were born.

What divorce rates were the year you were born

Divorce stems from the Latin word “divertere,” which means “to turn aside.” Unfortunately, for most, it isn’t quite that simple. Divorces can be a long, arduous process that takes months or even years. Crying children, legal fees, and bitter fights over silverware are the tropes that frequently come to mind when discussing divorce, and it’s perhaps those stigmas that are contributing to an overall decrease in divorce rates in the 21st century.

It could also be that marriages are, generally, occurring later in life. In one study, the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the chances of remaining married by the respondents 46th birthday were over 20% higher for couples who married between the ages of 29-34 compared to those who wed at ages 15-22, and studies show that the average age Americans tie the knot is steadily growing older and older. The gap narrows with closer age groups: 57.6% of couples who married at ages 23-28 were still together at their 46th birthday, compared to 65.2% for those aged 29-34.

Although divorce rates are generally falling, a CBS poll conducted in 2014 revealed 64% of Americans felt the average American family is weaker than when they were a child. Oh joy.

So what do the numbers say? Stacker compiled data from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) gathered by Randal Olson, as well as national marriage and divorce rates from 2000-2016 and Statista data about the national divorce rates from 1990-2016. The divorce rate was taken by dividing the overall population of the United States in a specific year by the number of divorces that occurred that year.

So how has our propensity for divorce changed over the years? Read on to see the divorce rate the year you were born.

© Torsten Blackwood // Getty

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