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12 Bountiful Plants to Start Growing in January

Veranda Logo By The Editors of VERANDA of Veranda | Slide 1 of 13: Planning a spring garden is a welcome reprieve from the months-long holiday hangover and is a wonderful way to start the year afresh. After all, your spring garden really begins with planting in the early months of the new year. For outdoor gardening, planting can start as early as January. While colder climates with frosty temperatures should wait out the last major frosts until early spring, it's better for warmer climates to get a head start. Choose slow-germinating perennials, cold-tolerant annuals, and landscaping shrubbery for January planting.Where it's still snowing, stick to indoor plants and greenhouse projects. January is also the perfect time to start planning out the garden and buying seeds. There is always a limited supply of seeds each year, so it's best to purchase early so you don't miss out on the best varieties.If colder climates constrain planting abilities in January, consider a greenhouse. Most plants can be seeded in a greenhouse and transplanted in early spring to the garden after the last freeze of the season. If spring isn't coming soon enough, then forcing bulbs is a great technique that doesn't even require being outside. “Forcing bulbs” means tricking bulb florals like tulips, hyacintha, and orchids into thinking that spring has come early by potting them indoors and giving them lots of natural light. Fragrant florals will abound a few weeks later, so plan accordingly!While most planting should be left to fall or spring, there are a variety of options that can still be planted in the winter months. It's best to check with your local nursery to find which varieties plant best in January in your area as every climate and locale are different. Happy planting!

Planning a spring garden is a welcome reprieve from the months-long holiday hangover and is a wonderful way to start the year afresh. After all, your spring garden really begins with planting in the early months of the new year. For outdoor gardening, planting can start as early as January. While colder climates with frosty temperatures should wait out the last major frosts until early spring, it's better for warmer climates to get a head start. Choose slow-germinating perennials, cold-tolerant annuals, and landscaping shrubbery for January planting.

Where it's still snowing, stick to indoor plants and greenhouse projects. January is also the perfect time to start planning out the garden and buying seeds. There is always a limited supply of seeds each year, so it's best to purchase early so you don't miss out on the best varieties.

If colder climates constrain planting abilities in January, consider a greenhouse. Most plants can be seeded in a greenhouse and transplanted in early spring to the garden after the last freeze of the season. If spring isn't coming soon enough, then forcing bulbs is a great technique that doesn't even require being outside. “Forcing bulbs” means tricking bulb florals like tulips, hyacintha, and orchids into thinking that spring has come early by potting them indoors and giving them lots of natural light. Fragrant florals will abound a few weeks later, so plan accordingly!

While most planting should be left to fall or spring, there are a variety of options that can still be planted in the winter months. It's best to check with your local nursery to find which varieties plant best in January in your area as every climate and locale are different. Happy planting!

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