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Perennial Flowers You Should Consider Putting In Your Yard

Country Living Logo By Arricca Elin Sansone, Country Living Staff of Country Living | Slide 1 of 26: If you don't have perennials in your garden, you're missing out! Annuals provide quick, season-long color, but perennial flowers and plants should be part of your garden, too! What's the difference between annuals and perennials? Annuals shine for one season, while perennials come back for many years so they're a great investment for any garden. They also tend to bloom for a shorter period of time (typically early, mid-season, and late in the season) with the show lasting a few weeks. By adding perennials, you'll round out your garden and enjoy many years of color from these hardy plants. Make sure when choosing that you read the plant tag or description to check their USDA Hardiness zone (find yours here), so they will survive winters in your region. And plant it where it gets the correct amount of sunlight. Full sun means 6 or more hours per day, while part sun is about half that. Shade means no direct sunlight. Don't try to cheat! Plants that need full sun won't bloom in shade, and shade lovers will fry in hot sun. You can plant perennials pretty much any time of year, as long as you keep them watered as they get established—but fall is an ideal time for planting when temperatures are cooler and rainfall is more plentiful. If you're looking for flowers to plant in fall, we've got you covered.Now check out our favorite perennial plants and flowers to add color and beauty to your garden all season long:

If you don't have perennials in your garden, you're missing out! Annuals provide quick, season-long color, but perennial flowers and plants should be part of your garden, too! What's the difference between annuals and perennials? Annuals shine for one season, while perennials come back for many years so they're a great investment for any garden. They also tend to bloom for a shorter period of time (typically early, mid-season, and late in the season) with the show lasting a few weeks. By adding perennials, you'll round out your garden and enjoy many years of color from these hardy plants. Make sure when choosing that you read the plant tag or description to check their USDA Hardiness zone (find yours here), so they will survive winters in your region. And plant it where it gets the correct amount of sunlight. Full sun means 6 or more hours per day, while part sun is about half that. Shade means no direct sunlight. Don't try to cheat! Plants that need full sun won't bloom in shade, and shade lovers will fry in hot sun. You can plant perennials pretty much any time of year, as long as you keep them watered as they get established—but fall is an ideal time for planting when temperatures are cooler and rainfall is more plentiful. If you're looking for flowers to plant in fall, we've got you covered.

Now check out our favorite perennial plants and flowers to add color and beauty to your garden all season long:

© Jacky Parker Photography - Getty Images

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