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Can YOU spot the frog? Amphibian uses its camouflage to hide from predators in the Amazon

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 9/4/2018 Julian Robinson for MailOnline

This camouflaged frog proved difficult to capture on camera as it hid from predators among fallen leaves. 

a close up of a tree: Hide and seek: Amazon horned frogs use the patterns on their skin to conceal themselves among leaves - but can you see the reptile in this photo? © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Hide and seek: Amazon horned frogs use the patterns on their skin to conceal themselves among leaves - but can you see the reptile in this photo?

Photographers eventually found the amphibian in its natural environment in Yasuni National park in Ecuador.

Even in pictures, the Amazon horned frog, which has a mouth wider than the length of its body, is hard to spot, thanks to its patterned skin. But a closer look reveals the frog is indeed in the frame.

a close up of a tree: Revealed: A closer look reveals the frog's location in the frame. Despite only being 12cm in length, these hunters can consume prey as large as a small reptiles and rodents © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Revealed: A closer look reveals the frog's location in the frame. Despite only being 12cm in length, these hunters can consume prey as large as a small reptiles and rodents
a close up of a rock: Photographers eventually found the reptile hiding among leaves in its natural environment in Yasuni National park in Ecuador © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Photographers eventually found the reptile hiding among leaves in its natural environment in Yasuni National park in Ecuador
a close up of a frog: Even in pictures, the Amazon horned frog, which has a mouth wider than the length of its body, is hard to spot thanks to its patterned skin © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Even in pictures, the Amazon horned frog, which has a mouth wider than the length of its body, is hard to spot thanks to its patterned skin

Professional wildlife photographer Chien Lee, 47, said: 'We were searching for all sorts of nocturnal creatures in the rainforest, but because these frogs are so rarely encountered, we hadn't didn't have much confidence that we would find one.

'In the daytime they are almost completely invisible due to their camouflage, but they can be found somewhat easier at night due to their eyeshine.

'There are many predators in the forest that their camouflage protects them from, including large birds and snakes, so it's a very effective adaptation.

'Although I had seen this species before in captivity, I was absolutely amazed to find one of these incredible frogs in their natural habitat.'

Despite only being 12cm in length, these frogs can consume prey as large as a small reptiles and rodents.

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