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The Marie Kondo effect: Charities beg kind-hearted people to stop dumping belongings into clothes bins as Netflix series causes donations spike

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 1/15/2019 Brittany Chain For Daily Mail Australia

a person posing for the camera: Japanese 'organising consultant' Marie Kondo (pictured) became a Netflix star after her decluttering book took the world by storm © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Japanese 'organising consultant' Marie Kondo (pictured) became a Netflix star after her decluttering book took the world by storm a group of items in it: Many embarked on a post-Christmas clean-out inspired by Ms Kondo's guidelines but some are dumping items at already overflowing donation bins © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Many embarked on a post-Christmas clean-out inspired by Ms Kondo's guidelines but some are dumping items at already overflowing donation bins Charities have stopped taking old and unwanted clothing after Marie Kondo's cult-like following sparked mass donations across Australia.

The Japanese 'organizing consultant' became a Netflix star after her decluttering book took the world by storm. 

Many embarked on a post-Christmas clean-out inspired by Ms Kondo's guidelines, but some are dumping items at already overflowing donation bins - and unwittingly causing charities a headache.

Lifeline's recent estimates suggest over half their stores in Australia have now stopped accepting donations. 

Jamie Mackay from Lifeline told ABC cleaning out the overflowing donation bins across the nation often cost upwards of 30 per cent of the charities funds.  

The National Association of Charitable Recycling Organisations (NACRO) estimates 60,000 tonnes of items that are either contaminated due to poor weather conditions or items that are simply unusable are taken to landfill each year.

Some items include dirty clothing, broken appliances and even soiled mattresses and nappies.   

These items are being dumped in and around charity bins putting a strain on charities which are having to employ people to collect, sift through and then take them to the trash.

a sign on the side of a house: Many of the items that end up in and around donation bins have to be taken to landfill anyway, at a cost to the charities © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Many of the items that end up in and around donation bins have to be taken to landfill anyway, at a cost to the charities

MARIE KONDO'S FAMOUS SIX STEP METHOD TO DECLUTTERING

Step 1. Commit yourself to tidying up

Step 2. Imagine your ideal lifestyle

Step 3. Finish discarding first

Step 4. Tidy by category, not by location 

Step 5. Follow the right order (clothes, books, paper, miscellaneous items, sentimental items) 

Step 6. Ask yourself, “Does it spark joy?” 

While some Lifeline stores are accepting in store donations, they are also encouraging people to seek out other charities and options.

Sustainability Victoria Acting CEO, Stephanie Ziersch, told Daily Mail Australia the KonMari method is positive, but highlighted the need for items to be 'consciously re-homed'. 

'The sudden spike in tidying up at home, combined with Christmas excess, New Year's resolutions for minimalism and the fact that many op shops are still closed for the holidays, risk creating the perfect storm for waste this month,' Ms Ziersch said. 

Ms Ziersch suggested households consider adding a seventh-step when applying Ms Kondo's famous KonMari method to their tidying up.

'Our simple request for Kondo-inspired declutterers is that instead of saying 'thank you, next' they instead find the joy in re-homing the items or recycling them thoughtfully and through the correct channels.

'In fact, there's a Japanese approach known as 'mottainai' that I suspect Marie Kondo would happily support. Quite simply, it encourages reflection on waste and action when it comes to reducing, reusing, recycling and respecting.' 

Specialized thrift stores also may accept certain products, like women's sanitary items, handbags or second hand business attire. 

Related: 12 Kitchen Organization Ideas That Would Make Marie Kondo Proud [Provided by: Food & Wine]

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