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Revealed: The coat of arms created for Meghan and approved by the Queen - featuring the same lion as her husband Harry's crest and golden poppies from her native California

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 5/25/2018 false

Meghan Markle wearing a hat © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The Coat of Arms created for the Duchess of Sussex has been unveiled. 

The design of the Arms was agreed and approved by Her Majesty The Queen and Thomas Woodcock (Garter King of Arms and Senior Herald in England), who is based at the College of Arms in London.  

The Coat of Arms are traditionally bestowed upon royal brides in the run up to their wedding, as was seen with the Duchess of Cambridge in 2011, however, Meghan's came after. 

Her Royal Highness worked closely with the College of Arms throughout the design process to create a Coat of Arms that was both personal and representative of her American roots. 

The crest is far more detailed than that of the Duchess of Cambridge, who was given a family Coat of Arms in 2011 - which featured three acorns on a simple shield.  

The blue background of the shield represents the Pacific Ocean off the California coast, while the two golden rays across the shield are symbolic of the sunshine of the Duchess's home state. The three quills represent communication and the power of words.  

Beneath the shield on the grass sits a collection of golden poppies, California's state flower, and wintersweet, which grows at Kensington Palace.

The Coat of Arms of the Duchess of Sussex has been unveiled, including subtle nods towards Meghan's native California © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The Coat of Arms of the Duchess of Sussex has been unveiled, including subtle nods towards Meghan's native California

It is customary for Supporters of the shield to be assigned to Members of the Royal Family, and for wives of Members of the Royal Family to have one of their husband's Supporters and one relating to themselves. 

The Supporter relating to The Duchess of Sussex is a songbird with wings elevated as if flying and an open beak, which with the quill represents the power of communication.

A Coronet has also been assigned to The Duchess of Sussex. It is the Coronet laid down by a Royal Warrant of 1917 for the sons and daughters of the Heir Apparent. It is composed of two crosses patée, four fleurs-de-lys and two strawberry leaves.

The arms of a married woman are shown with those of her husband and the technical term is that they are impaled meaning placed side by side in the same shield.

a close up of a box: Prince Harry's coat of arms also features a lion as a 'supporter', it is customery for wives of the royals to have one of their husband's supporters on their crest © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Prince Harry's coat of arms also features a lion as a 'supporter', it is customery for wives of the royals to have one of their husband's supporters on their crest

Thomas Woodcock, Garter King of Arms said: 'The Duchess of Sussex took a great interest in the design. 

'Good heraldic design is nearly always simple and the Arms of The Duchess of Sussex stand well beside the historic beauty of the quartered British Royal Arms. 

'Heraldry as a means of identification has flourished in Europe for almost nine hundred years and is associated with both individual people and great corporate bodies such as Cities, Universities and for instance the Livery Companies in the City of London. '

The College of Arms, a branch of the Royal household, is the official body in the UK that deals with coats of arms and their team of experts - funded by the fees they charge and not taxpayers money - design and research heraldic or genealogical issues. 

There is still speculation as to whether Meghan's father Thomas Markle will receive a coat of arms as both Kate Middleton and Sophie Rhys-Jones' fathers did when they were married.

The reason for the delay may be that Mr Markle, a retired Hollywood lighting director who lives in Mexico, is a U.S. citizen, so needs to prove that he has an ancestor who was a subject of the Crown.

This should not be too difficult, as his forebears include Mary Smith, a maid who was recorded in 1856 as working at Windsor Castle, where Meghan was married. 

a close up of a sign: Meghan's crest has stark contrasts with Kate's (pictured) with the Duchess of Cambridge opting to have a family Coat of Arms rather than an individual one © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Meghan's crest has stark contrasts with Kate's (pictured) with the Duchess of Cambridge opting to have a family Coat of Arms rather than an individual one

Meghan's Coat of Arms suggests an air of independence in comparison to the Duchess of Cambridge's in 2011.

Before her wedding to Prince William, Kate's family was awarded the crest, rather than the royal bride alone.

Although Kate was entitled to apply for a heraldic design in her own right, it was her father, Michael, who actually entered the petition.

This gives his entire family – including his other children, Pippa and James, as well as wife Carole – the right to use the emblem. 

The design is simple, with three leafy acorns representing each of the couple's three children – an idea suggested by Kate herself. 

Acorns were chosen for the analogy that they grow into great oaks. Oak is also a symbol of England and strength, and West Berkshire, where the children were brought up, has many oak trees. 

a person in a wedding dress: Two years after they were married The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had a joint Coat of Arms created, known as a Conjungal Coat of Arms © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Two years after they were married The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had a joint Coat of Arms created, known as a Conjungal Coat of Arms

a close up of a box: The joint crest combines elements of both Kate and William, with acorns a nod towards the Middleton Coat of Arms and royal emblems supporting William's side © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The joint crest combines elements of both Kate and William, with acorns a nod towards the Middleton Coat of Arms and royal emblems supporting William's side

Two years after their wedding the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had a joint Coat of Arms created, known as a Conjugal Coat of Arms. 

In the center of Kate's emblem is a gold chevron representing the Duchess's mother, Carole, at the heart of the family. Her family name was Goldsmith. 

The two thin white chevrons on either side indicate, remarkably, the family's love of skiing and mountains, while the background colors of red and blue were chosen as they are the principal colors of the flag of the UK and match William's own shield.

William's design is a version of the Royal Coat of Arms which was granted to him by the Queen on his 18th birthday.

It shows the various royal emblems of the United Kingdom: the three lions of England, the lion of Scotland and the harp of Ireland.

It is surrounded by a blue garter bearing the motto Honi soit qui mal y pense – Shame to those who think evil of it – which symbolizes the Order of the Garter of which he is a Knight Companion.

Both shields are supported by the Duke of Cambridge's 'supporters' – a royal lion and unicorn, each wearing a three pointed collar, known as a label. 

The label has a red scallop shell derived from the Spencer coat of arms, which has been used by the ancestors of Princess Diana for centuries.

Flowing out from the top of the Conjugal Coat of Arms is 'mantling', which represents the slashed cloth hung around the necks of knights fighting in the heat of the Middle East during the Crusades. 

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