You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

How to Clean Every Single Thing in Your Kitchen

Taste of Home Logo By Lauren Pahmeier of Taste of Home | Slide 1 of 27: Cast irons can last a lifetime (literally). That is, if you take care of them right. Knowing how to clean a cast-iron skillet will help it last for that long, if not longer—but proper care is a little bit trickier than it is for other pans. After you're done making that chocolate chip skillet cookie or one of our other cast-iron skillet recipes, rinse the pan as soon as it's cooled down to dislodge the food scraps. If you need to, you can use a little bit of soap with the hot water. (Hopefully, it won't take much more than that, but if you need to take more drastic measures, you can always re-season the pan.) Then, rinse and dry it, and reinforce the seasoning by applying a light coat of oil with a paper towel. Though it's unlikely, you should replace your cast iron when it has chips or cracks in the surface.

How to Clean a Cast-Iron Skillet

Cast irons can last a lifetime (literally). That is, if you take care of them right. Knowing how to clean a cast-iron skillet will help it last for that long, if not longer—but proper care is a little bit trickier than it is for other pans.

After you're done making that chocolate chip skillet cookie or one of our other cast-iron skillet recipes, rinse the pan as soon as it's cooled down to dislodge the food scraps. If you need to, you can use a little bit of soap with the hot water. (Hopefully, it won't take much more than that, but if you need to take more drastic measures, you can always re-season the pan.)

Then, rinse and dry it, and reinforce the seasoning by applying a light coat of oil with a paper towel. Though it's unlikely, you should replace your cast iron when it has chips or cracks in the surface.

© YelenaYemchuk/Getty Images

MORE FROM TASTE OF HOME

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon