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Make Your Garden Pop With Eye-Catching Annual Flowers and Plants

Country Living Logo By Terri Robertson, Jessica Leigh Mattern of Country Living | Slide 1 of 19: So, you’re looking for a little seasonal color to make your garden pop. Perhaps you want a quick way to boost curb appeal or brighten up your backyard landscape. Enter annual plants!What does annual plant mean? An annual plant completes its lifecycle within one year, which means it does not return the next year. True annuals include flowers like zinnias, cosmos, larkspur, and most marigolds and sunflowers. Yet, often the line between annual versus perennial gets blurred, and we might cultivate a perennial as an annual for a variety of reasons. It might be “tender” (i.e. not cold hardy in our climate), the bulb might not store easily, or it otherwise loses its luster (think pansies looking leggy and spent in the summer)—but for the time we have it, it sure does put on a show. Here, we've included annuals in both camps.Keep in mind that annuals can be less expensive in the short term, but pricier in the long run, as landscape designer Daniel McCurry of Father Nature Landscapes, headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, explains: “Annual plantings are fun to plan into garden designs to create a sense of health, texture, and substance. Since you need to replace the plantings twice a year, they are much more costly than shrub borders or perennials. Given that they add so much to a garden, we typically design flower beds with all the above.” Now for the show! Try these top annual flowers and plants for seasonal highlights throughout the summer, spring, and fall.Favorite Annual Flowers and Plants

So, you’re looking for a little seasonal color to make your garden pop. Perhaps you want a quick way to boost curb appeal or brighten up your backyard landscape. Enter annual plants!

What does annual plant mean? An annual plant completes its lifecycle within one year, which means it does not return the next year. True annuals include flowers like zinnias, cosmos, larkspur, and most marigolds and sunflowers. Yet, often the line between annual versus perennial gets blurred, and we might cultivate a perennial as an annual for a variety of reasons. It might be “tender” (i.e. not cold hardy in our climate), the bulb might not store easily, or it otherwise loses its luster (think pansies looking leggy and spent in the summer)—but for the time we have it, it sure does put on a show. Here, we've included annuals in both camps.

Keep in mind that annuals can be less expensive in the short term, but pricier in the long run, as landscape designer Daniel McCurry of Father Nature Landscapes, headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, explains: “Annual plantings are fun to plan into garden designs to create a sense of health, texture, and substance. Since you need to replace the plantings twice a year, they are much more costly than shrub borders or perennials. Given that they add so much to a garden, we typically design flower beds with all the above.”

Now for the show! Try these top annual flowers and plants for seasonal highlights throughout the summer, spring, and fall.

Favorite Annual Flowers and Plants

© Yana Tatevosian / 500px - Getty Images

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