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10 Strict Grammar Rules It’s Probably Safe to Ignore

Reader's Digest Logo By Bathroom Readers Institute of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 10: This rule has been drilled into grade schoolers' heads: 'Never begin a sentence with and, but, or or.' It turns out there’s no rule against doing so. According to Oxford Dictionary Myth Debunkers, 'The argument against using a preposition to introduce a sentence is that such a sentence expresses an incomplete thought (or ‘fragment’) and is therefore incorrect.' But if it has a subject and predicate (as in 'And then I went home.') it’s a sentence. If it doesn’t ('and then home') it’s not.

Starting a sentence with a conjunction

This rule has been drilled into grade schoolers' heads: 'Never begin a sentence with and, but, or or.' It turns out there’s no rule against doing so. According to Oxford Dictionary Myth Debunkers, 'The argument against using a preposition to introduce a sentence is that such a sentence expresses an incomplete thought (or ‘fragment’) and is therefore incorrect.' But if it has a subject and predicate (as in 'And then I went home.') it’s a sentence. If it doesn’t ('and then home') it’s not.

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