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22 History Lessons Your Teacher Lied to You About

Reader's Digest Logo By Elisa Roland of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 22: No one can deny that<a href='https://www.rd.com/true-stories/inspiring/inspiring-stories-9-ordinary-people-who-changed-history/1/'> Rosa Parks played a pivotal role in the Civil Rights movement</a> by refusing to move to the back of the bus for being African American, but one can deny she was sitting in the whites-only section. Back on that late December day in 1955 Montgomery, Alabama, <a href='http://www.history.com/news/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-rosa-parks'>History.com</a> confirms that Ms. Parks was actually sitting in the first row of the middle section for African Americans—the 'colored' section. But when more passengers boarded, the bus became packed and a white man was left standing. The driver then demanded Parks and three other African American passengers move further back so this man could take their seats. As the story goes Rosa wouldn't stand for it.

Rosa Parks was not sitting in the white-only section

No one can deny that Rosa Parks played a pivotal role in the Civil Rights movement by refusing to move to the back of the bus for being African American, but one can deny she was sitting in the whites-only section. Back on that late December day in 1955 Montgomery, Alabama, History.com confirms that Ms. Parks was actually sitting in the first row of the middle section for African Americans—the 'colored' section. But when more passengers boarded, the bus became packed and a white man was left standing. The driver then demanded Parks and three other African American passengers move further back so this man could take their seats. As the story goes Rosa wouldn't stand for it.
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