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70 Words (and Phrases) You’re Probably Using All Wrong

Reader's Digest Logo By Lauren Cahn of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 70: If you're using this phrase to mean 'for all practical purposes,' then for all intents and purposes, you're doing it wrong (see what we did there?). The phrase, 'for all intensive purposes' is a <a href='http://grammarist.com/mondegreens/'>mondegreen</a>, which is defined as a misheard version of a phrase, saying or slogan. The phrase you're actually looking for (as you've probably guessed by now) is 'for all intents and purposes.' Try these <a href='https://www.rd.com/culture/fancy-words-sound-smarter/1'>fancy words if you want to sound smarter</a>.

For all intensive purposes

If you're using this phrase to mean 'for all practical purposes,' then for all intents and purposes, you're doing it wrong (see what we did there?). The phrase, 'for all intensive purposes' is a mondegreen, which is defined as a misheard version of a phrase, saying or slogan. The phrase you're actually looking for (as you've probably guessed by now) is 'for all intents and purposes.' Try these fancy words if you want to sound smarter.
© Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.com, shuttertstock

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