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The 50 Cities with the Worst Commutes in America

Best Life Logo By Alex Daniel of Best Life | Slide 1 of 51: It’s a fundamental truth that everyone who has a commute is guaranteed to complain about it—regardless of how bad it truly is. Well, to help put your own commute in perspective, we dug into the data to figure out which cities have the longest (and truly worst) commutes overall. Some of the results are as you might expect: artery-clogged California dominates this list, as does the greater New York City area, which is home to more than 8 million people. But there are also a few surprises (Los Angeles doesn’t even crack the top 25!). So take a look and see where you rank. And if you’re living in one of these top cities, make sure you know the 7 Ways to Make Your Commute the Best Part of Your Day.Our Methodology: All of these results were pulled from U.S. Census Bureau data for the 200 largest cities in the United States. Final “commute score” was calculated by combining the mean travel time to work, the percentage of the population who spend 60 minutes or more in their commute, the growth rate of a city, and considerations of the percentage who worked at home or biked/walked to work.

It’s a fundamental truth that everyone who has a commute is guaranteed to complain about it—regardless of how bad it truly is. Well, to help put your own commute in perspective, we dug into the data to figure out which cities have the longest (and truly worst) commutes overall. Some of the results are as you might expect: artery-clogged California dominates this list, as does the greater New York City area, which is home to more than 8 million people. But there are also a few surprises (Los Angeles doesn’t even crack the top 25!). So take a look and see where you rank. And if you’re living in one of these top cities, make sure you know the 7 Ways to Make Your Commute the Best Part of Your Day.

Our Methodology: All of these results were pulled from U.S. Census Bureau data for the 200 largest cities in the United States. Final “commute score” was calculated by combining the mean travel time to work, the percentage of the population who spend 60 minutes or more in their commute, the growth rate of a city, and considerations of the percentage who worked at home or biked/walked to work.

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