You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The Expert's Guide to Speed Reading a Book

Best Life Logo By Ari Notis of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: <p>The average American reads at a rate of about 200 words per minute. If you’re college educated? 300. No matter how you cut it, though, it should take you no more than 90 seconds to burn through this article. But what if you could shave off some time from that number? What if you could power through in half a minute, and still retain all of the information? We’d call that speed reading. And you’d want to be able to do that, right? It’s a skill that certainly could help on those nights where you’re stuck late at your <a href="http://bestlifeonline.com/desktop-backgrounds/">desk</a> with piles of documents to read.</p><p>Luckily, there’s a way. “It’s as simple as: inspecting, reading, inquiring, storing,” says Paul Nowak, CEO of <a href="https://www.irisreading.com/">IRIS Reading</a>, an organization that has offered speed reading seminars to everyone from Goldman Sachs to the FBI to students at Yale and NYU. (In case you didn’t pick up on this, Nowak’s method is an acronym for his company.) And for more great brain hacks, check out <a href="http://bestlifeonline.com/video-games-make-you-smarter/">the 8 video games that are scientifically proven to make you smarter</a>.</p>

The Expert's Guide to Speed Reading a Book | Best Life

The average American reads at a rate of about 200 words per minute. If you’re college educated? 300. No matter how you cut it, though, it should take you no more than 90 seconds to burn through this article. But what if you could shave off some time from that number? What if you could power through in half a minute, and still retain all of the information? We’d call that speed reading. And you’d want to be able to do that, right? It’s a skill that certainly could help on those nights where you’re stuck late at your desk with piles of documents to read.

Luckily, there’s a way. “It’s as simple as: inspecting, reading, inquiring, storing,” says Paul Nowak, CEO of IRIS Reading, an organization that has offered speed reading seminars to everyone from Goldman Sachs to the FBI to students at Yale and NYU. (In case you didn’t pick up on this, Nowak’s method is an acronym for his company.) 

© Provided by Best Life

More from Best Life

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon