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10 Ways to Live Longer, According to the Longest-Living People in the World

Reader's Digest Logo By Marissa Laliberte of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 10: Nabi Tajima is the oldest verified person in the world. Unsurprisingly, the 117-year-old is from Japan, a country where people are known to live longer than others. At 83.6 years, the country's life expectancy is second highest in the world, just behind Hong Kong’s 84 years. Tajima hasn’t spoken publicly about how she’s lived to meet 35 great-great grandchildren, but there’s a good chance her diet is key. One Japanese <a href='http://www.bmj.com/content/352/bmj.i1209'>study</a> found that citizens who stuck with the country’s dietary guidelines had lower risk of mortality in general and from cardiovascular disease. (Here are more <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/eating-habits-long-life/1/'>easy eating habits your 80-year-old self will thank you for</a>.) The guidelines are heavy on grains and veggies, balanced by meat, fish, and soy, plus just a couple servings each of fruits and dairy. (Just be warned: It's possible to show <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/diet-weight-loss/too-many-carbs/1/'>signs of eating too many carbs</a>.) It’s worth noting, though, that grains in Japan are more likely to be rice or noodles than a piece of white bread. Learn the <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/live-longer-worlds-healthiest-village/'>eating habit that helps the world's healthiest village live longer</a>.

Eat more carbs

Nabi Tajima is the oldest verified person in the world. Unsurprisingly, the 117-year-old is from Japan, a country where people are known to live longer than others. At 83.6 years, the country's life expectancy is second highest in the world, just behind Hong Kong’s 84 years. Tajima hasn’t spoken publicly about how she’s lived to meet 35 great-great grandchildren, but there’s a good chance her diet is key. One Japanese study found that citizens who stuck with the country’s dietary guidelines had lower risk of mortality in general and from cardiovascular disease. (Here are more easy eating habits your 80-year-old self will thank you for.) The guidelines are heavy on grains and veggies, balanced by meat, fish, and soy, plus just a couple servings each of fruits and dairy. (Just be warned: It's possible to show signs of eating too many carbs.) It’s worth noting, though, that grains in Japan are more likely to be rice or noodles than a piece of white bread. Learn the eating habit that helps the world's healthiest village live longer.
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