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8 Little Changes You Can Make to Sleep Better in Just One Day

Reader's Digest Logo By Lisa Marie Conklin of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 8: Noshing in bed is not great for getting for sleeping. 'Eating in the bedroom, especially right before bedtime, can be very disruptive to sleep,' says Robert I. Danoff, DO, family physician and program director, Aria Health System. <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/high-sodium-foods/1">Salt-filled snacks</a> could make you thirsty, drinking too much fluid prior to bedtime may cause extra trips to the bathroom, and any caffeine within four hours of sleep may keep you awake or cause disrupted sleep. Caffeine can also make you feel anxious and jittery. (These are signs you may be <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/wellness/drinking-too-much-coffee/1">consuming too much caffeine</a>.) Eating before bed is also one of many <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/diet-weight-loss/nighttime-habits-weight-gain/1">nighttime habits that can lead to weight gain</a>.

Stop snacking in bed

Noshing in bed is not great for getting for sleeping. 'Eating in the bedroom, especially right before bedtime, can be very disruptive to sleep,' says Robert I. Danoff, DO, family physician and program director, Aria Health System. Salt-filled snacks could make you thirsty, drinking too much fluid prior to bedtime may cause extra trips to the bathroom, and any caffeine within four hours of sleep may keep you awake or cause disrupted sleep. Caffeine can also make you feel anxious and jittery.
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