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This woman is taking selfies with every man who catcalls her

Hello Giggles logo Hello Giggles 10/5/2017 Gabriela Herstik

This woman is taking selfies with every man who catcalls her © dearcatcallers / https://www.instagram.com/p/BZeIQuoF6CZ/ This woman is taking selfies with every man who catcalls her There’s not a woman or femme-identifying person who doesn’t know how it feels to be catcalled. Whether we’re walking down the street to get groceries, getting out of our car for our daily coffee, or simply on the way to work, it feels like the harassment never stops. And when we’re in the midst of being catcalled, many of us have to suck it up and stifle our only sane reaction: to defend ourselves and say something. We can’t even stand our ground without fear of a violent reaction. What are we to do? Well, for 20-year-old Noa Jarsma, the answer is taking a selfie with her catcallers.

Welcome to “dearcatcallers,” an Instagram account that Noa started for all the times she gets catcalled.

<p> This week, Uber <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/travis-kalanick-is-taking-time-away-from-uber-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> temporarily lost its CEO</a>, saw a board member leave after making a <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/uber-david-bonderman-jokes-theres-more-talking-when-women-join-boards-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> sexist comment</a>, and was sued by a rape victim who alleges the company improperly gained <a href="http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/r-update-1-rape-victim-sues-uber-claiming-it-wrongly-obtained-her-medical-records-2017-6-1002097439?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> access to her medical records</a>.</p><p> This isn't the ride-hailing giant's first tangle with controversy.</p><p> It's been under a cloud since February, when former Uber engineer Susan Fowler published <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/hr-experts-how-uber-can-recover-harassment-scandal-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> allegations about the company's culture of harassment</a> on her blog. Fowler's bombshell mentions a supervisor who propositioned her for sex, an HR department reluctant to look into her complaints, and a workplace that appeared hostile to women.</p><p> This prompted several investigations at Uber, including one headed by former Attorney General Eric Holder, which led <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/uber-fired-more-than-20-employees-as-part-of-its-sex-harassment-probe-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> to the recent firing of more than 20 employees</a>.</p><p><a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/changes-uber-is-making-to-its-company-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> The company pledged to make changes</a> as a result of the investigation's findings. These steps include revamping its institutional values, prioritizing measures that promote diversity and inclusion, and cleaning up its hard-partying reputation, as <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/changes-uber-is-making-to-its-company-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> Business Insider's Biz Carson reported</a>. Now Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has taken <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/travis-kalanick-is-taking-time-away-from-uber-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> a leave of absence from the company</a>.</p><p> With headlines like these, it can seem like the workplace has gone to the bros.</p><p> In a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/01/opinion/sunday/jerks-and-the-start-ups-they-ruin.html?_r=0"> New York Times piece</a>, Dan Lyons portrays an average bro as a hustling, amoral young man who places "winning" above all else in business. "Bro culture" is what ensues when those typically inexperienced men take over the C-suite and allow their obnoxiousness to seep into the rest of the company.</p><p> The resulting "bro culture" tends to prioritize young men over all other employees, creating an environment that's ripe for toxic behaviors like excessive partying and systemic harassment of colleagues.</p><p> Many are blaming Uber's woes on the rise of bro culture. But is there a cure for this toxicity? And can it be prevented?</p> 'Bro culture' might be insidious, but it's not unavoidable

The account documents the men who harassed Noa alongside what they said and did, and documents all the times Noa got catcalled in a month. Though she documented only 24 instances, there were actually more; some men left before she could take a photo, and at times she didn’t feel safe enough to take one at all.

#dearcatcallers

A post shared by dearcatcallers (@dearcatcallers) on

The most uncomfortable part of this account, however, has to be how happy these men look in the pictures. These men don’t realize that what they’re doing is wrong, and they don’t see the selfies as documenting harassment.

They don’t feel shame because they don’t recognize that they should feel shame, and that’s the issue.

#dearcatcallers ... after following me for straight 10 minutes "sexy girl Where you goin'?? Can I come with you ?" ...

A post shared by dearcatcallers (@dearcatcallers) on

Although she originally started the project for a month, Noa has since decided to extend it so women around the world can contribute.

#dearcatcallers

A post shared by dearcatcallers (@dearcatcallers) on

We hope this project continues to shed light on the harassment so many of us face in our day-to-day lives — one selfie at a time.

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