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Here's how much the police make in all 50 states

Money Talks News Logo By Stacy Johnson of Money Talks News | Slide 1 of 51: Straight 8 Photography / Shutterstock.com
Protecting and serving the American public isn’t an easy job, and it can be a dangerous one.
As former President Barack Obama put it in 2016:
“[W]e tell the police, ‘You’re a social worker; you’re the parent; you’re the teacher; you’re the drug counselor.’ We tell them to keep those neighborhoods in check at all costs and do so without causing any political blowback or inconvenience; don’t make a mistake that might disturb our own peace of mind.”

So, how much do the police make for keeping the peace? The average hourly wage in each state ranges from $17 to $48.
Following are the average annual and hourly wages of police and sheriff’s officers in all 50 states, along with the number of such jobs in each state. The states are ranked based on the average annual wage, from lowest to highest.
The information comes from the latest occupational employment and wage data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is from May 2017 unless otherwise noted.
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How much it pays to protect and serve

Protecting and serving the American public isn’t an easy job, and it can be a dangerous one.

As former President Barack Obama put it in 2016:

“[W]e tell the police, ‘You’re a social worker; you’re the parent; you’re the teacher; you’re the drug counselor.’ We tell them to keep those neighborhoods in check at all costs and do so without causing any political blowback or inconvenience; don’t make a mistake that might disturb our own peace of mind.”

So, how much do the police make for keeping the peace? The average hourly wage in each state ranges from $17 to $48.

Following are the average annual and hourly wages of police and sheriff’s officers in all 50 states, along with the number of such jobs in each state. The states are ranked based on the average annual wage, from lowest to highest.

The information comes from the latest occupational employment and wage data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is from May 2017 unless otherwise noted. Click or swipe through to see the full list.

© Straight 8 Photography / Shutterstock.com

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