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The 100 colleges with the biggest tuition hikes

Graphiq Logo By Dustin Clendenen | Data work by Eva Revear of Graphiq | Slide 1 of 100: <p>As of April 2017, student loan debt in the U.S. has ballooned to over <a href="http://studentloanhero.com/student-loan-debt-statistics/">$1.4 trillion</a>. This is in large part due to record enrollment in higher education and skyrocketing tuition costs over the past five decades. The average 2016 college graduate had $37,172 in student loan debt when they entered the job market. </p><p>Since 1995, the average tuition and fees at private universities increased by <a href="http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/2015/07/29/chart-see-20-years-of-tuition-growth-at-national-universities">179 percent</a>, while tuition and fees for out-of-state students at public universities rose 226 percent. In-state tuition and fees at public colleges grew the most, jumping nearly 300 percent. </p><p>With that in mind, the data analysts at <a href="http://www.startclass.com/">StartClass</a>, an education research site by <a href="https://www.graphiq.com/">Graphiq</a>, identified the 100 American universities that have experienced the largest tuition hikes in the last decade. To do this, they used data from the National Center for Education Statistics to determine the tuition and fee cost for the 2005-2006 school year and compared it to the cost of the 2015-2016 school year. The list is sorted on the percent increase of tuition costs for in-state undergraduates (out-of-state data is also included on the slides) at degree-granting, public and private not-for-profit institutions with at least 5,000 students. </p><p>Surprisingly, of the 100 institutions on this list, all but two are public <a href="http://colleges.startclass.com/">colleges</a>. Many of the schools have either seen decreases in state funding or insubstantial increases that don’t cover rising costs, forcing universities to rely more on tuition to maintain their operating budget. </p><p><a href="http://colleges.startclass.com/l/1314/Western-Illinois-University">Western Illinois University</a> in particular had state funding slashed from 51 percent of its core revenue to just 19 percent over a ten-year period. Despite the 61 percent tuition increase during the same period, university officials had to consider <a href="http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/06/14/questions-raised-about-cuts-liberal-arts-programs-western-illinois">cutting degree programs</a>. Colorado state schools, meanwhile, have virtually cut state appropriations entirely in exchange for a<a href="https://www.collegeincolorado.org/Home/COF/College_Opportunity_Fund.aspx"> tuition stipend</a> program that students can apply for. Without it, an enrollee is responsible for both their share and the state's share of tuition.</p><p>Note: All 2005 costs are inflation-adjusted to 2015 dollars. Ties in percent in-state tuition increases occur due to rounding.</p>

The 100 colleges with the biggest tuition hikes

As of April 2017, student loan debt in the U.S. has ballooned to over $1.4 trillion. This is in large part due to record enrollment in higher education and skyrocketing tuition costs over the past five decades. The average 2016 college graduate had $37,172 in student loan debt when they entered the job market.

Since 1995, the average tuition and fees at private universities increased by 179 percent, while tuition and fees for out-of-state students at public universities rose 226 percent. In-state tuition and fees at public colleges grew the most, jumping nearly 300 percent.

With that in mind, the data analysts at StartClass, an education research site by Graphiq, identified the 100 American universities that have experienced the largest tuition hikes in the last decade. To do this, they used data from the National Center for Education Statistics to determine the tuition and fee cost for the 2005-2006 school year and compared it to the cost of the 2015-2016 school year. The list is sorted on the percent increase of tuition costs for in-state undergraduates (out-of-state data is also included on the slides) at degree-granting, public and private not-for-profit institutions with at least 5,000 students.

Surprisingly, of the 100 institutions on this list, all but two are public colleges. Many of the schools have either seen decreases in state funding or insubstantial increases that don’t cover rising costs, forcing universities to rely more on tuition to maintain their operating budget.

Western Illinois University in particular had state funding slashed from 51 percent of its core revenue to just 19 percent over a ten-year period. Despite the 61 percent tuition increase during the same period, university officials had to consider cutting degree programs. Colorado state schools, meanwhile, have virtually cut state appropriations entirely in exchange for a tuition stipend program that students can apply for. Without it, an enrollee is responsible for both their share and the state's share of tuition.

Note: All 2005 costs are inflation-adjusted to 2015 dollars. Ties in percent in-state tuition increases occur due to rounding.

Click through to see the whole list.

© David McNew / Getty Images

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