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The 9 biggest mistakes people make when asking for a raise

The Street Logo By Chris Ciaccia of The Street | Slide 1 of 10: The annual performance review: while it can be a dreaded time for both the employer and employee, it's often a time to discuss what can be done better, what's going right and where the employee stands in the company's eyes. And with that standing often comes one important thing -- salary. Wages have been on the rise in recent months, thanks to a stronger economy and continued demand for employees. According to the most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average hourly earnings for all non-farm payroll employees rose 4 cents to $26.22 an hour in May. Over the past year, average hourly earnings have risen 63 cents or 2.5%, with the average work week remaining steady at 34.4 hours. While a 2.5% raise does outpace the cost of inflation, employees are often left wanting more, especially finding out what peers are making at other companies, via such websites as Glassdoor, an online employment company. Bringing up compensation can often be tricky, but it's most often discussed during the review. More often than not, there will be a discussion of the employee's worth to the company, Mikaela Kiner, Founder/CEO of UniquelyHR told Glassdoor, noting that "companies and managers are having to make tough decisions about where and how to allocate rewards like raises and promotions." As employees and employers often differ on what the employee is worth, there are plenty of booby traps and missteps that can upend your quest for a salary boost. Courtesy of Glassdoor, here are nine mistakes that can stifle your chances of getting a raise.

The 9 biggest mistakes people make when asking for a raise

The annual performance review: while it can be a dreaded time for both the employer and employee, it's often a time to discuss what can be done better, what's going right and where the employee stands in the company's eyes. And with that standing often comes one important thing -- salary.

Wages have been on the rise in recent months, thanks to a stronger economy and continued demand for employees. According to the most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average hourly earnings for all non-farm payroll employees rose 4 cents to $26.22 an hour in May. Over the past year, average hourly earnings have risen 63 cents or 2.5%, with the average work week remaining steady at 34.4 hours.

While a 2.5% raise does outpace the cost of inflation, employees are often left wanting more, especially finding out what peers are making at other companies, via such websites as Glassdoor, an online employment company.

Bringing up compensation can often be tricky, but it's most often discussed during the review. More often than not, there will be a discussion of the employee's worth to the company, Mikaela Kiner, Founder/CEO of UniquelyHR told Glassdoor, noting that "companies and managers are having to make tough decisions about where and how to allocate rewards like raises and promotions."

As employees and employers often differ on what the employee is worth, there are plenty of booby traps and missteps that can upend your quest for a salary boost.

Courtesy of Glassdoor, click through to see nine mistakes that can stifle your chances of getting a raise.

© TheStreet

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