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This is the lowest-ranked retail chain in America

Reader's Digest logo Reader's Digest 7/4/2018 Marissa Laliberte

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Video by Chicago Tribune

We all have our favorite go-to stores, where we know we can find items we love at a price we’re comfortable with—and then there are the retailers we avoid. A recent Harris Poll survey looked at 100 of America’s biggest companies to find out which ones were the most loved and which get a bad rap.

About 25,800 U.S. adults rated companies based on the factors such as product quality and social consciousness, which Harris Poll translated into an overall reputation rank. Based on the findings, one thing is clear: People aren’t crazy about Sears.

Sears Holdings Corporation, which owns Sears and Kmart, earned a 64.09 out of 100, giving it the lowest grade of any other retail company in the poll—even lower than McDonald’s (72.39) and Walmart (68.52), which weren’t even in the bottom five. And this was no one-off Sears smearing. The American Customer Satisfaction Index’s 2017 retail report ranked Sears as the second most hated department or discount store, just ahead of Walmart. Find out what ACSI ranked as the worst hotel chains in America.

Apparently, reputation speaks wonders too: The company has closed about 2,500 Sears and Kmart stores over the past decade as it’s struggled to compete with online competitors and department stores with better reputations.

The Harris Poll also revealed that shoppers aren’t excited to buy from Sprint Corporation or Chipotle, which have the second and third worst retail reputations, respectively. But for every hated store, there are ones with glowing reputations. Amazon.com was the most beloved retail chain in the survey, with a score of 83.22, followed by Wegmans (82.75) and Chick-fil-A (81.68). They sure beat this grocery store with the worst reputation in America.

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