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States where food stamps are used the most

Stacker Logo By Seth Berkman of Stacker | Slide 1 of 51: Last summer, the Trump administration proposed changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) that can restrict food stamp benefits for about 3 million U.S. residents, and nearly 10% of the people to be affected will be children. More children may lose access to free or reduced school lunches, and states may also lose their flexibility to administer food stamps.

The federal government argues that they are aiming to close loopholes in food stamp distribution, potentially saving $2.5 billion. Resources like food banks remain vital in battling food insecurity, and data shows food stamps create 12 meals for one meal a food bank can provide.

More than a dozen states have joined in a lawsuit to prevent the rule from being enacted in April, claiming the rule "undermines the nutrition program's intent and the U.S. Department of Agriculture violated the rulemaking process." SNAP began as a temporary relief program but became permanent in 1964. In 2017, the federal government spent $70 billion on SNAP. Nationwide, 15.2% of households receive food stamps, with an average cost per household of $237.86.

As many Americans wait to see if the new food stamp laws will come to fruition, millions continue to go hungry throughout the nation. Stacker compiled a list of the states where food stamps are used the most using SNAP data from the USDA. The data was released on Jan. 17, 2020. The number of households and the poverty rate are current as of 2018 data from the Census Bureau. States are ranked by the percent of households that received food stamps in September 2019. The District of Columbia was included in the analysis, but North Carolina was not included since data was not provided. Additional information came from sources like the Center for American Progress, Feeding America, and state websites and local food banks.

Click through to find out where your state ranks in terms of food stamp usage, and what is being done to curb hunger and food insecurity in your area.

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Federal cuts loom to SNAP program loom for many Americans

Last summer, the Trump administration proposed changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) that can restrict food stamp benefits for about 3 million U.S. residents, and nearly 10% of the people to be affected will be children. More children may lose access to free or reduced school lunches, and states may also lose their flexibility to administer food stamps.

The federal government argues that they are aiming to close loopholes in food stamp distribution, potentially saving $2.5 billion. Resources like food banks remain vital in battling food insecurity, and data shows food stamps create 12 meals for one meal a food bank can provide.

More than a dozen states have joined in a lawsuit to prevent the rule from being enacted in April, claiming the rule "undermines the nutrition program's intent and the U.S. Department of Agriculture violated the rulemaking process." SNAP began as a temporary relief program but became permanent in 1964. In 2017, the federal government spent $70 billion on SNAP. Nationwide, 15.2% of households receive food stamps, with an average cost per household of $237.86.

As many Americans wait to see if the new food stamp laws will come to fruition, millions continue to go hungry throughout the nation. Stacker compiled a list of the states where food stamps are used the most using SNAP data from the USDA. The data was released on Jan. 17, 2020. The number of households and the poverty rate are current as of 2018 data from the Census Bureau. States are ranked by the percent of households that received food stamps in September 2019. The District of Columbia was included in the analysis, but North Carolina was not included since data was not provided. Additional information came from sources like the Center for American Progress, Feeding America, and state websites and local food banks.

Click through the gallery above to find out where your state ranks in terms of food stamp usage, and what is being done to curb hunger and food insecurity in your area.

You may also like: The cost of a beer the year you turned 21

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