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9 things you'll regret keeping in a safe deposit box

Kiplinger Logo By Bob Niedt of Kiplinger | Slide 1 of 10: In today’s digital age, in which seemingly anything that matters is stored virtually in the cloud, a physical safe deposit box comes across as a relic of the bricks-and-mortar past. But don’t be too hasty to dismiss the importance of keeping certain valuables securely tucked away in your bank’s vault. A safe deposit box can offer critical protection for important documents and prized possessions; old, valuable baseball cards inherited from a relative, for example.  A safe deposit box isn’t a wise choice for everything, however. We talked to experts to come up with a list of nine things you might come to regret locking away in your bank, which isn’t open nights, holidays or perhaps even weekends. Take note that access to your safe deposit box could be even more limited during emergencies. The coronavirus pandemic has reduced operating hours for some bank branches, and major banks, including Bank of America, have temporarily closed select branches. Others require an appointment for in-branch services, such as access to your safe deposit box. That would complicate your ability to retrieve important documents or items when you need them. Instead, experts recommend storing important items that you need to access more frequently or on short notice in a fireproof home safe that’s bolted to the floor. See the list of safe deposit box no-no’s. SEE ALSO: 11 Best Things to Keep in a Safe Deposit Box

In today’s digital age, in which seemingly anything that matters is stored virtually in the cloud, a physical safe deposit box comes across as a relic of the bricks-and-mortar past. But don’t be too hasty to dismiss the importance of keeping certain valuables securely tucked away in your bank’s vault. A safe deposit box can offer critical protection for important documents and prized possessions; old, valuable baseball cards inherited from a relative, for example.

A safe deposit box isn’t a wise choice for everything, however. We talked to experts to come up with a list of nine things you might come to regret locking away in your bank, which isn’t open nights, holidays or perhaps even weekends.

Take note that access to your safe deposit box could be even more limited during emergencies. The coronavirus pandemic has reduced operating hours for some bank branches, and major banks, including Bank of America, have temporarily closed select branches. Others require an appointment for in-branch services, such as access to your safe deposit box. That would complicate your ability to retrieve important documents or items when you need them.

Instead, experts recommend storing important items that you need to access more frequently or on short notice in a fireproof home safe that’s bolted to the floor.

Click ahead to see the list of safe deposit box no-no’s.

SEE ALSO: 11 Best Things to Keep in a Safe Deposit Box

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