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8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses for sale right now

Curbed logo Curbed 2/13/2020 Megan Barber

Itchin’ to surround yourself in architectural history all day, every day? We’ve found eight different homes—all currently for sale—designed by the legendary American architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

Some are Prairie School gems that look out onto verdant gardens. Others are among Wright’s earliest designs, with steeply pitched roofs and Japanese influence. And there’s even a home for sale that personifies Wright’s late-career, rounded style, featuring a cantilevered spiral ramp. They range in price and location, but all eight homes are fantastic Wright creations just waiting to be snatched up.

If buying a Wright home isn’t in the cards, don’t fret—consider a vacation in one of these Wright-designed homes for rent instead.

a large building: A circular concrete brick building features a swirling ramp that leads up to a second story with lots of windows. © Courtesy of Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty A circular concrete brick building features a swirling ramp that leads up to a second story with lots of windows.

The David and Gladys Wright House

Price: $9,999,999

Details: Located in Phoenix, Arizona, this three-bedroom, four-bath house is an early example of Wright’s late-career rounded style, which realized its apex in his Guggenheim Museum in New York City. It was built in 1952 for Wright’s son David and wife Gladys—they called it their Taj Mahal—and boasts a cantilevered, spiral walk up, and kitchen tower.

“It was a family home, and he had a son pushing him to design something unique and special,” owner Zach Rawling told Curbed in an interview from 2015. “It was Wright elevating his game and delivering one of his most creative designs.” The house also features hand-cut Philippine mahogany, custom-designed furnishings, and a shaded central courtyard.

a small house in a garden: The entry to a flat-roofed, overhanging midcentury home. The covered entrance is lit up and there is a wet driveway and landscaping surrounding the home. © Photo by Bill Krampitz of TK Images LLC The entry to a flat-roofed, overhanging midcentury home. The covered entrance is lit up and there is a wet driveway and landscaping surrounding the home.

The Thaxton House

Price: $2,850,000

Details: One of only three Wright-designed homes in Texas, the Thaxton House was originally constructed in 1955 as a modest 1,800-square-foot Usonian. A 1995 renovation added 6,300 square feet and used Wright’s L-shaped, single-story building as a centerpiece.

The home retains many original features like redwood and mahogany woods, polished concrete floors, concrete blocks, and plate glass. A parallelogram-shaped pool was part of Wright’s initial design, and the kitchen in the older structure is still largely what the iconic architect envisioned. See the interior photos over here.

a house with bushes in front of a building: A two-story beige home with dark brown trim features flat roofs and blossoming trees surrounding it. © Courtesy of L. W. Reedy Real Estate A two-story beige home with dark brown trim features flat roofs and blossoming trees surrounding it.

The Henderson House

Price: $850,000

Details: Located in the west Chicago suburb of Elmhurst, this 5,500-square-foot residence was constructed in 1901 in the Prairie School style. It has Wright’s signature broad horizontal lines, low hipped roofs, and a design that embraces nature.

It contains five bedrooms, four bathrooms, 80 leaded art glass windows, three brick fireplaces, and an open floorplan that seamlessly blends a living room, dining room, and library. Its long veranda and deck overlook the property’s landscaped grounds. See the interior photos here.

a small house in a garden with Meyer May House in the background: A two-story light beige home with a red tile roof sits in carefully landscaped gardens. A sidewalk runs around the house and trees surround the property. © Photo by VHT Studios, courtesy of Catherine Simon Vobornik A two-story light beige home with a red tile roof sits in carefully landscaped gardens. A sidewalk runs around the house and trees surround the property.

The Coonley Stable

Price: $995,000

Details: This three-bedroom, four-and-a-half house began life in 1912 as the stables of a 10-acre estate. Located in Riverside, a suburb of Chicago, the home is part of the Avery Coonley Estate, one of just three Prairie-style estates completed by Wright. Converted to a home decades ago, this 3,417-square-foot residence’s most striking feature is its 94 art glass windows.

Extensive renovations—including updates of the mechanical and climate systems—combine with other perks like a lily pond, a private walled garden, a two-car garage, and heated floors.

a large lawn in front of a house: A yellow home with green trim and a steeply pitched roof sits on a grassy lawn with trees all around. © Courtesy of Armond Boulware A yellow home with green trim and a steeply pitched roof sits on a grassy lawn with trees all around.

The Foster House

Price: $175,000

Details: Originally constructed in 1900, the Foster Home is one of Wright’s earlier, non-Prairie-style designs. The home was constructed for Stephen Foster, a real estate attorney who worked with developers around the West Pullman neighborhood in Chicago. Instead of flat roofs and long horizontal lines, the Foster house features a steeply pitched roof and a spacious covered patio. Inside you’ll find wood accents, a fireplace, and red carpet that may be hiding original hardwood floors.

a house with bushes in front of a building: A white two-story house with long horizontal lines and dark brown trim sits in front of a driveway and green lawn. © Courtesy of Coldwell Banker A white two-story house with long horizontal lines and dark brown trim sits in front of a driveway and green lawn.

The Keir House

Price: $724,000

Details: The Keir House is a concrete beauty built in 1914 in the Ravine Bluffs subdivision of Chicago. An evolution of Wright’s 1907 Fireproof House for $5,000 concept, the house is all Prairie School—with a wood and stucco exterior, broad overhanging eaves, and an attached porte cochere.

While the millwork and brick fireplace are consistent with Wright’s original vision for the home, other aspects of the interior are less authentic. The North Shore property has seen a number of changes, including a family room addition, updated bathrooms, and a newer kitchen. See more over here.

a couple of lawn chairs sitting on top of a green yard: A beige two-story home with large column-like windows and a flat, overhanging roof sits in a forest of green. © Photo by Nick Miller/VHT Studios, courtesy of Compass listing agent Mike McCurry A beige two-story home with large column-like windows and a flat, overhanging roof sits in a forest of green.

The Avery Coonley Playhouse

Price: $650,000

Details: This suburban Illinois home was first built in 1912 as a private elementary school known as the Avery Coonley Playhouse. Located on the grounds of Wright’s larger Avery Coonley House in Riverside, Illinois, the former schoolhouse features a bold cantilevering roof and contrasting horizontal and vertical elements.

In 1917, architect William Drummond expanded the structure and converted it into a home. Since then the playhouse has seen multiple modifications, additions, and—more recently—a restoration back to Wright’s original vision. The stand-out feature is the reproduction art glass windows with playful, balloon-like designs.

a house with bushes in front of a building: A two-and-a-half story house features a covered porch, gray walls, and lots of greenery surrounding the home. © Photo courtesy of Steven Hattan of Perfect View 3D A two-and-a-half story house features a covered porch, gray walls, and lots of greenery surrounding the home.

The William H. Copeland House

Price: $1,167,500

Details: Located in Chicago’s Neil Park Historic District, the Copeland House is a rare Wright project that saw the architect renovating another architect’s work. The 1873 structure was originally built for William H. Harman in then-fashionable Italianate style by an unknown architect. In 1908, new owner Dr. William Copeland, a well-to-do surgeon, hired Wright—whose home and office was just four lots down the block—to design a combination coach house and garage. Happy with Wright’s work on that addition, Copeland then contracted him to renovate the main house.

Wright’s proposed Prairie-Style design would be watered down, per Copeland’s wishes, but amid the wraparound front porch, new tile roof, and reworked interior complete with custom woodwork, there remain the touches that recall the new style Wright was then popularizing, such as the low-pitched hip roof and modern interiors. Read more, this way.

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