You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Best (and Worst) Movie Remakes of All Time

24/7 Wall St. Logo By Steven M. Peters of 24/7 Wall St. | Slide 1 of 103: In their perpetual pursuit of profits, movie studios often remake films rather than take a risk on something completely new. These safe bets often pan out, as audiences flock to the theater to see the new rendition of a familiar title. In some instances, moviegoers find that the remake has accomplished the uncommon feat of surpassing the original flick in quality.The likelihood of a remake being great largely depends on the reasons behind its production. When films are remade to cash in on the original’s success, they frequently fail to recapture the magic. When a movie is remade because the filmmakers see ways to reinterpret or improve on the telling of the story, they are often excellent.24/7 Wall St. determined the best and worst movie remakes of all time by creating an index based on user ratings from the Internet Movie Database and Rotten Tomatoes.An exceptional remake will often eclipse the original film. For example, Alfred Hitchcock remade his own “The Man Who Knew Too Much” in 1956. In an interview with filmmaker François Truffaut, Hitchcock said, "The first version is the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional."Even when a remake is great it is not always better than the first movie. This is often true when movies are remade for different markets or updated after long periods of time. The American horror film “Let Me In” and the original Swedish “Let the Right One In” are both considered to be good movies – one version was simply made with the English-speaking market in mind. William Friedkin’s 1997 remake of “12 Angry Men” is also one of the better remakes, yet few would say it surpasses the 1957 original. The 40-year gap between the releases ensure enough differences for each to be strong in its own right.Despite the many high quality remakes in the world, the phrase continues to be associated with studio cash grabs. It’s not uncommon for a successful movie to be followed years down the line by a subpar remake intended to draw out fans of the original. This is especially common in the horror genre, which is known for its dedicated fanbase. At least 18 of the films on our list of 50 worst remakes belong to the horror genre.

In their perpetual pursuit of profits, movie studios often remake films rather than take a risk on something completely new. These safe bets often pan out, as audiences flock to the theater to see the new rendition of a familiar title. In some instances, moviegoers find that the remake has accomplished the uncommon feat of surpassing the original flick in quality.

The likelihood of a remake being great largely depends on the reasons behind its production. When films are remade to cash in on the original’s success, they frequently fail to recapture the magic. When a movie is remade because the filmmakers see ways to reinterpret or improve on the telling of the story, they are often excellent.

24/7 Wall St. determined the best and worst movie remakes of all time by creating an index based on user ratings from the Internet Movie Database and Rotten Tomatoes.

An exceptional remake will often eclipse the original film. For example, Alfred Hitchcock remade his own “The Man Who Knew Too Much” in 1956. In an interview with filmmaker François Truffaut, Hitchcock said, "The first version is the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional."

Even when a remake is great it is not always better than the first movie. This is often true when movies are remade for different markets or updated after long periods of time. The American horror film “Let Me In” and the original Swedish “Let the Right One In” are both considered to be good movies – one version was simply made with the English-speaking market in mind. William Friedkin’s 1997 remake of “12 Angry Men” is also one of the better remakes, yet few would say it surpasses the 1957 original. The 40-year gap between the releases ensure enough differences for each to be strong in its own right.

Despite the many high quality remakes in the world, the phrase continues to be associated with studio cash grabs. It’s not uncommon for a successful movie to be followed years down the line by a subpar remake intended to draw out fans of the original. This is especially common in the horror genre, which is known for its dedicated fanbase. At least 18 of the films on our list of 50 worst remakes belong to the horror genre.

© Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

More From 24/7 Wall St.

AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon