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The Most Infamous Love Triangles in Rock History

People Logo People | Slide 1 of 8: George Harrison first met 19-year-old model Pattie Boyd in 1964 on the set of the Beatles' first film, A Hard Day's Night. He was instantly smitten, and the pair were married less than two years later. Though reasonably happy throughout the '60s—Harrison wrote the classic track "Something" in her honor—their marriage began to deteriorate by the end of the decade, around the same time he became close friends with fellow guitar god Eric Clapton. Clapton also fell in love with Boyd, ultimately confessing his feelings to the couple. She initially refused his advances, sending him spiraling into a drug-fueled depression. Amid the haze of his growing addiction to heroin and alcohol, he penned the tracks that would become his opus, 1970's Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. The album's title track directly addresses the unrequited love in its lyrics: "I tried to give you consolation / When your old man had let you down / Like a fool, I fell in love with you / Turned my whole world upside down." Several years later, Boyd left Harrison for good, and she and Clapton began living together in 1974. "Eric was very attractive and persuasive," she later said. "George and I had many problems in our relationship that had a great deal to do with the enormity of his fame and his increasing passion for meditation and the spiritual life. He frequently simply wasn’t there for me, and there were other women.” Clapton immortalized her in song yet again, penning the gentle "Wonderful Tonight" for her. The former Beatle bore no ill-will towards his friend, jokingly referring to him as his "husband-in-law." Harrison even attended the pair's 1979 wedding. "I’d rather she be with him than some dope," he told Rolling Stone at the time. Sadly, their union didn't last and they divorced in 1988.

GEORGE HARRISON, PATTIE BOYD, ERIC CLAPTON

George Harrison first met 19-year-old model Pattie Boyd in 1964 on the set of the Beatles' first film, A Hard Day's Night. He was instantly smitten, and the pair were married less than two years later. Though reasonably happy throughout the '60s—Harrison wrote the classic track "Something" in her honor—their marriage began to deteriorate by the end of the decade, around the same time he became close friends with fellow guitar god Eric Clapton. Clapton also fell in love with Boyd, ultimately confessing his feelings to the couple. She initially refused his advances, sending him spiraling into a drug-fueled depression. Amid the haze of his growing addiction to heroin and alcohol, he penned the tracks that would become his opus, 1970's Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. The album's title track directly addresses the unrequited love in its lyrics: "I tried to give you consolation / When your old man had let you down / Like a fool, I fell in love with you / Turned my whole world upside down." Several years later, Boyd left Harrison for good, and she and Clapton began living together in 1974. "Eric was very attractive and persuasive," she later said. "George and I had many problems in our relationship that had a great deal to do with the enormity of his fame and his increasing passion for meditation and the spiritual life. He frequently simply wasn’t there for me, and there were other women.” Clapton immortalized her in song yet again, penning the gentle "Wonderful Tonight" for her. The former Beatle bore no ill-will towards his friend, jokingly referring to him as his "husband-in-law." Harrison even attended the pair's 1979 wedding. "I’d rather she be with him than some dope," he told Rolling Stone at the time. Sadly, their union didn't last and they divorced in 1988.

© Fox Photos/Getty; Graham Wiltshire/Redferns

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