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Authorities: Explosives in shooting were functional

Houston Chronicle logo Houston Chronicle 5/20/2018 Gabrielle Banks

Police and FBI carrying tools towards a home believed to be related to the fatal school shooting earlier in the day at Santa Fe High School on Tuesday, May 18, 2018, in Santa Fe, TX. © Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle Police and FBI carrying tools towards a home believed to be related to the fatal school shooting earlier in the day at Santa Fe High School on Tuesday, May 18, 2018, in Santa Fe, TX. Some explosives found at Santa Fe High School after the mass shooting that killed 10 Friday were functional, law enforcement officials revealed Sunday.

Early reports indicated that the bomb materials -- CO2 canisters wrapped with duct tape -- were non-operational.

Several explosive devices, including a CO2 device and a Molotov cocktail, were found in a home and a vehicle.

Federal agents are continuing to investigate the shooting and test evidence, according to a source familiar with the investigation. The Justice Department is considering filing additional charges against Dimitrios Pagourtzis, a 17-year-old junior who is facing charges of capital murder and aggravated assault of a police officer.

Because he is only 17 he is not eligible for the death penalty or life in prison without parole. If convicted on the state charges, Pagourtzis could theoretically be eligible for parole in 40 years.

A Pearland Police armored vehicle stands ready in front of Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, in response to a shooting on Friday morning, May 18, 2018. (Kevin M. Cox/The Galveston County Daily News via AP) © Kevin M. Cox, Associated Press A Pearland Police armored vehicle stands ready in front of Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas, in response to a shooting on Friday morning, May 18, 2018. (Kevin M. Cox/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)

Federal law enforcement could submit separate federal charges if the evidence indicates that the materials that went into making the devices were purchased using a credit or debit card or online and the transactions crossed state lines.

Gabrielle Banks covers federal court for the Houston Chronicle. Follow her on Twitter and send her email at gabrielle.banks@chron.com.

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