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These States Receive the Most Disaster Aid Every Year

GOBankingRates Logo By John Csiszar of GOBankingRates | Slide 1 of 36: Natural disasters are a part of life, particularly in a country with the physical reach of the United States. With so many geological and topographical features spread out over such a wide area, America is susceptible to a vast array of disasters, from earthquakes and floods to hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts and fires. Natural disasters in the U.S. tend to strike regionally, although just about any event may occur at any time in any region. For example, hurricanes tend to hammer Florida, Louisiana and Texas, but the entire eastern seaboard of the U.S. is under threat from annual hurricanes. California suffers through wildfires and earthquakes, but Alaska, also on the “Pacific Ring of Fire,” actually has the most earthquakes in the U.S. annually and suffered through the second-largest earthquake ever recorded in the world, in 1964. Other disasters, such as major volcanic eruptions, have hit Hawaii and Washington, while the Great Plains is home to Tornado Alley. Things have already gotten off to a bad start in 2020. In an unprecedented move, the U.S. government declared a nationwide emergency on March 13, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This effectively made the entire nation a disaster area, removing the need for individual governors to request emergency status for their states. With trillions of dollars already spent on the crisis, state and federal government officials alike are no doubt bracing for the effects of additional disasters that may strike in 2020. Since hurricane season officially begins on June 1, GOBankingRates decided to look at the total amount of disaster relief each state in the U.S. has received over a seven-year period, along with the amount of average annual aid received and the number of disasters that each state has endured since 1953. For additional perspective, the GOBankingRates study also looked at the amount of COVID-19 aid each state has received thus far. Using this data, states were ranked according to the amount of aid received, from least to most. Any state that received less than $1 million in disaster relief over the past seven years was removed from the rankings. COVID-19 aid was not factored into the rankings and appears only as supplemental information. Although it might be expected to see a state like Florida ranking No. 2 on this list, there are some surprises. North Carolina, appearing at No. 7 on the list, received nearly triple the funding as the No. 8 state South Carolina, even though they are adjacent to one another. Meanwhile, Nebraska, sitting in the heart of the Great Plains, ranks last on the 35-state list, needing just $1 million in federal aid from 2013 to 2020. The bottom line is that disaster can strike anywhere at any time, as evidenced both by the figures on the list and by the nationwide disaster declaration that all states are currently enduring. Although your state and federal government stand ready to help, you can take proactive steps by protecting your home against natural disasters.  Last updated: May 29, 2020

Natural disasters are a part of life, particularly in a country with the physical reach of the United States. With so many geological and topographical features spread out over such a wide area, America is susceptible to a vast array of disasters, from earthquakes and floods to hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts and fires.

Natural disasters in the U.S. tend to strike regionally, although just about any event may occur at any time in any region. For example, hurricanes tend to hammer Florida, Louisiana and Texas, but the entire eastern seaboard of the U.S. is under threat from annual hurricanes. California suffers through wildfires and earthquakes, but Alaska, also on the “Pacific Ring of Fire,” actually has the most earthquakes in the U.S. annually and suffered through the second-largest earthquake ever recorded in the world, in 1964. Other disasters, such as major volcanic eruptions, have hit Hawaii and Washington, while the Great Plains is home to Tornado Alley.

Things have already gotten off to a bad start in 2020. In an unprecedented move, the U.S. government declared a nationwide emergency on March 13, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This effectively made the entire nation a disaster area, removing the need for individual governors to request emergency status for their states. With trillions of dollars already spent on the crisis, state and federal government officials alike are no doubt bracing for the effects of additional disasters that may strike in 2020.

Since hurricane season officially begins on June 1, GOBankingRates decided to look at the total amount of disaster relief each state in the U.S. has received over a seven-year period, along with the amount of average annual aid received and the number of disasters that each state has endured since 1953. For additional perspective, the GOBankingRates study also looked at the amount of COVID-19 aid each state has received thus far.

Using this data, states were ranked according to the amount of aid received, from least to most. Any state that received less than $1 million in disaster relief over the past seven years was removed from the rankings. COVID-19 aid was not factored into the rankings and appears only as supplemental information.

Although it might be expected to see a state like Florida ranking No. 2 on this list, there are some surprises. North Carolina, appearing at No. 7 on the list, received nearly triple the funding as the No. 8 state South Carolina, even though they are adjacent to one another. Meanwhile, Nebraska, sitting in the heart of the Great Plains, ranks last on the 35-state list, needing just $1 million in federal aid from 2013 to 2020.

The bottom line is that disaster can strike anywhere at any time, as evidenced both by the figures on the list and by the nationwide disaster declaration that all states are currently enduring. Although your state and federal government stand ready to help, you can take proactive steps by protecting your home against natural disasters

 

Last updated: May 29, 2020

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