You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

21 famous fakes and hoaxes

Slide 1 of 21: Left: Orson Welles, radio and stage actor, whose dramatization, Oct. 30, 1938 of an H. G. Wells novel titled “War of the Worlds” which related the “invasion” of New Jersey by a horde of men from mars was interpreted by listeners as an actual news broadcast of the events supposed to presume the end of the world. Panicked listeners fled into streets to get away from the invaders: radio and police stations were swamped with calls all over the country - the broadcast was nation - wide (CBS) - and in Newark 15 persons were treated for shock after they rushed out of their homes to escape what appeared to be certain doom. Welles is after the broadcast. (AP Photo)

Right: UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 31:  New York Daily News Front page dated Oct. 31, 1938 Headline: FAKE RADIO 'WAR' STIRS TERROR THROUGH U.S. Orson Welles, after broadcast, expresses amazement at public reaction. He adapted H.G. Wells "War of the Worlds" for radio and played principal role. Left: a machine conceived for another H.G. Wells story. Dramatic description of landing of weird "machine from Mars" strarted last night's panic.  (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)

1. Orson Welles' 'War of the Worlds'

Orson Welles, staged a radio dramatization on Oct. 30, 1938 of an H. G. Wells novel titled “War of the Worlds." The story of an invasion in New Jersey by a horde of men from mars was interpreted by listeners as an actual news broadcast of the events supposed to presume the end of the world. Panicked listeners fled into streets to get away from the invaders, and radio and police stations were swamped with calls all over the country. In Newark, 15 people were treated for shock after they rushed out of their homes to escape what appeared to be certain doom.

© AP Photo; NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon