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NCAA to allow championship events in states with sports gambling

USA TODAY SPORTS logo USA TODAY SPORTS 5/17/2018 Tom Schad

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Roughly 72 hours after the Supreme Court paved the way for individual states to legalize sports gambling, the NCAA said it will temporarily suspend its current policy and allow states that condone sports gambling to host championship events.

In a news release Thursday morning, the NCAA announced that it is adjusting its policy in the wake of Monday's ruling to "ensure championship location continuity." The NCAA's policy had previously prevented states that allow "single-game sports wagering" from hosting championship events.

The organization also clarified that Monday's decision does not change its rules prohibiting sports gambling. NCAA coaches, administrators and staff are still not allowed to gamble on sports, nor are the more 460,000 athletes who compete in 24 sanctioned sports.

MORE: A state-by-state guide to sports betting in light of Supreme Court ruling

MORE: NFL, MLB, NBA and others react to Supreme Court decision

Meanwhile, NCAA President Mark Emmert called for a federal regulatory framework for sports gambling, echoing other sports governing bodies like the NFL.

"While we recognize the critical role of state governments, strong federal standards are necessary to safeguard the integrity of college sports and the athletes who play these games at all levels," Mark Emmert said in the statement.

Chris Grove, who oversees the sports betting practice of Eilers & Krejcik Gaming LLC, told USA TODAY Sports earlier this week that the timing of the Supreme Court's ruling — after most state legislatures have adjourned — will likely ensure that most states will not be able to legalize sports gambling until 2019.

Grove said about 20 states have considered, or are considering, the legalization of sports gambling — "and I expect that number to balloon." New Jersey, West Virginia, Delaware and Mississippi are expected to be among the first states to open sports books following Monday's ruling.

Contributing: Steve Berkowitz

Contact Tom Schad at tschad@usatoday.com or on Twitter @Tom_Schad.

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