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Researchers just found a WWII shipwreck that was lost for over 75 years off the coast of an Alaskan island

Business Insider Logo By Jeremy Berke of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 22:  Almost exactly 75 years ago, on August 18, 1943, the USS Abner Read was rocked by a  severe explosion. The blast - which most historians say was likely a Japanese landmine - tore the 75-foot stern section of the ship clean off. The stern plummeted to the depths of the ocean, taking the lives of 71 US sailors with it, while other US ships rushed to the rescue. Though the rest of the USS Abner Read was miraculously saved and towed into port, the original stern was thought to be lost forever - until now. On July 17, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-funded team of scientists, divers, and archaeologists discovered the missing section of the ship in just under 300 feet of water off the coast of  Kiska Island, a part of Alaska's remote Aleutian Islands chain. Here's what the expedition to discover the long-lost wreck was like.

Almost exactly 75 years ago, on August 18, 1943, the USS Abner Read was rocked by a severe explosion.

The blast - which most historians say was likely a Japanese landmine - tore the 75-foot stern section of the ship clean off. The stern plummeted to the depths of the ocean, taking the lives of 71 US sailors with it, while other US ships rushed to the rescue.

Though the rest of the USS Abner Read was miraculously saved and towed into port, the original stern was thought to be lost forever - until now.

On July 17, a team of scientists, divers, and archaeologists partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration discovered the missing section of the ship in just under 300 feet of water off the coast of Kiska Island, a part of Alaska's remote Aleutian Islands chain.

Here's what the expedition to discover the long-lost wreck was like.

© Image courtesy of Kiska: Alaska's Underwater Battlefield expedition.

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