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17 Rarely Seen Photos of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Reader's Digest Logo By Lauren Cahn of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 17: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, born Joan Ruth Bader in Brooklyn, New York in 1933, was the 107th Justice appointed to the United States Supreme Court, as well as the Supreme Court's second female and first Jewish female jurist. Her death on September 18, at age 87, came after five bouts with cancer over the course of her life. When diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2009, her fighting mantra became "I will live," which was inspired by her friendship with opera singer Marilyn Horne, not to mention her love of opera in general. To the relief of her supporters on both sides of the political aisle, Ginsburg was true to her word, living for another 11 years during which she continued interpreting the laws of the United States and the U.S. Constitution (here is why Supreme Court Justices serve for life). Her audacious and often scathing written dissents to the highest Court's official decisions earned her the moniker, "Notorious R.B.G." while laying her own hopeful groundwork for future reform.

"I will live." — Ruth Bader Ginsberg, 1933 - 2020

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, born Joan Ruth Bader in Brooklyn, New York in 1933, was the 107th Justice appointed to the United States Supreme Court, as well as the Supreme Court's second female and first Jewish female jurist. Her death on September 18, at age 87, came after five bouts with cancer over the course of her life.

When diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2009, her fighting mantra became "I will live," which was inspired by her friendship with opera singer Marilyn Horne, not to mention her love of opera in general. To the relief of her supporters on both sides of the political aisle, Ginsburg was true to her word, living for another 11 years during which she continued interpreting the laws of the United States and the U.S. Constitution (here is why Supreme Court Justices serve for life). Her audacious and often scathing written dissents to the highest Court's official decisions earned her the moniker, "Notorious R.B.G." while laying her own hopeful groundwork for future reform.

© Jeffrey Markowitz/Getty Images

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