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Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about politics?

Stacker Logo By Andrew Lisa of Stacker | Slide 1 of 51: In the 1950s, quiz shows dominated American television so thoroughly that when the “The $64,000 Pyramid” aired, crime rates dropped and President Dwight Eisenhower demanded not to be disturbed. Shows like “Tic-Tac-Dough,” “The Big Surprise,” “Twenty One,” and many others were in stiff competition for viewers, millions of whom tuned in to watch contestants put their wits on display for the chance to win big bucks, which advertisers and studios raked in no matter who won. Then, in 1958, a backup contestant on a quiz show called “Dotto” found a notebook filled with answers backstage, realized the game was likely rigged, and called authorities. “Dotto” was soon pulled from the air and a flurry of revelations spurred public outcry, official subpoenas, grand juries, and congressional investigations. It soon came out that fraud was rampant and that many of the most popular shows on television were plainly fixed. Ratings plummeted and by 1960, the great American quiz show industry was finished, as virtually no game shows remained on the air. In 1963, television personality and producer Merv Griffin came up with an idea to reassure skeptical, scandal-fatigued audiences with a brand new quiz-show format. The idea was to give the answers upfront and make the contestants respond with questions, thereby making it impossible to cheat by giving players the answers in advance. “Jeopardy!” was born. If you love the show, chances are good you love playing along at home—and if you're a political junkie, now you can play along with Stacker. Using the J! Archive, Stacker developed a list of the best political questions ever asked on the show. From the Founding Fathers to sitting senators, the questions span the political spectrum—and they appear here just as Alex Trebek asked them on television. Think you know your stuff? Then get ready to play along. You may also like: Can you answer these real "Jeopardy!" questions about the economy?

Can you answer these real 'Jeopardy!' clues about politics?

In the 1950s, quiz shows dominated American television so thoroughly that when the “The $64,000 Pyramid” aired, crime rates dropped and President Dwight Eisenhower demanded not to be disturbed. Shows like “Tic-Tac-Dough,” “The Big Surprise,” “Twenty One,” and many others were in stiff competition for viewers, millions of whom tuned in to watch contestants put their wits on display for the chance to win big bucks, which advertisers and studios raked in no matter who won.

Then, in 1958, a backup contestant on a quiz show called “Dotto” found a notebook filled with answers backstage, realized the game was likely rigged, and called authorities. “Dotto” was soon pulled from the air and a flurry of revelations spurred public outcry, official subpoenas, grand juries, and congressional investigations. It soon came out that fraud was rampant and that many of the most popular shows on television were plainly fixed. Ratings plummeted and by 1960, the great American quiz show industry was finished, as virtually no game shows remained on the air.

In 1963, television personality and producer Merv Griffin came up with an idea to reassure skeptical, scandal-fatigued audiences with a brand new quiz-show format. The idea was to give the answers upfront and make the contestants respond with questions, thereby making it impossible to cheat by giving players the answers in advance. “Jeopardy!” was born.

If you love the show, chances are good you love playing along at home—and if you're a political junkie, now you can play along with Stacker. Using the J! Archive, Stacker developed a list of the best political questions ever asked on the show. From the Founding Fathers to sitting senators, the questions span the political spectrum—and they appear here just as Alex Trebek asked them on television.

Think you know your stuff? Then get ready to play along.

You may also like: Can you answer these real "Jeopardy!" questions about the economy?

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