You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

These 36 Republican Senators Voted No on the Respect for Marriage Act

Bloomberg logo Bloomberg 11/30/2022 Ella Ceron
A community member’s silhouette is seen through a Pride flag while paying their respects to the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on November 20, 2022. © Photographer: JASON CONNOLLY/AFP A community member’s silhouette is seen through a Pride flag while paying their respects to the victims of the mass shooting at Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on November 20, 2022.

(Bloomberg) -- More Americans than ever support same-sex marriage — yet 36 Republican senators voted against the measure on Tuesday.

Most Read from Bloomberg

The Respect for Marriage Act, which enshrines federal protection for same-sex marriage, advanced 61-36, following a 62-37 procedural vote on Nov. 16. Twelve GOP lawmakers joined a united front of Democrats in supporting the legislation. 

The bill was introduced by Democratic Senators Dianne Feinstein of California and Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin as well as Maine Republican Susan Collins. It came to the floor after lawmakers passed an amendment that ensures that the measure does not infringe on religious and conscience protections. The measure now goes back to the House for final approval. If it passes there, as expected, President Joe Biden has promised to sign it into law.

Senator Raphael Warnock, who is currently campaigning in the Georgia run-off election, was the only Democrat not to cast a vote. Republican Senators Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Ben Sasse of Nebraska did not vote either. Sasse did not vote in the procedural vote earlier in November.

Read More: Same-Sex Marriage Bill Passes Senate With Bipartisan Support

Some of the Republican Senators who previously objected to the bill had argued that it was unnecessary, and questioned whether the Supreme Court would ever overturn the 2015 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges that requires states to grant and recognize same-sex marriage. Advocates for LGBTQ rights have increasingly pushed for codifying same-sex marriage rights. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said the court should “reconsider” the Obergefell ruling and others in a concurring opinion filed for the June Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling that overturned the Roe v. Wade decision, which established a constitutional right to an abortion.

Read More: What the Same-Sex Marriage Bill in Congress Would and Wouldn’t Do

These are the senators who voted against protecting same-sex marriage at the federal level.

Voted Nay

John Barrasso, Wyoming Marsha Blackburn, Tennessee John Boozman, Arkansas Mike Braun, Indiana Bill Cassidy, Louisiana John Cornyn, Texas Tom Cotton, Arkansas Kevin Cramer, North Dakota Mike Crapo, Idaho Ted Cruz, Texas Steve Daines, Montana Deb Fischer, Nebraska Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Chuck Grassley, Iowa Bill Hagerty, Tennessee Josh Hawley, Missouri John Hoeven, North Dakota Cindy Hyde-Smith, Mississippi Jim Inhofe, Oklahoma Ron Johnson, Wisconsin John Kennedy, Louisiana James Lankford, Oklahoma Mike Lee, Utah Roger Marshall, Kansas Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Jerry Moran, Kansas Rand Paul, Kentucky Jim Risch, Idaho Mike Rounds, South Dakota Marco Rubio, Florida Rick Scott, Florida Tim Scott, South Carolina Richard Shelby, Alabama John Thune, South Dakota Tommy Tuberville, Alabama Roger Wicker, Mississippi

--With assistance from Jarrell Dillard.

Most Read from Bloomberg Businessweek

©2022 Bloomberg L.P.

AdChoices
AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon