You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

NASA astronaut to vote from outer space: ‘If we can do it from space, then I believe folks can do it from the ground’

New York Daily News logo New York Daily News 9/25/2020 Joseph Wilkinson
a person wearing a mask: This photo provided by NASA. Expedition 64 crew member NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, is seen during Soyuz qualification exams Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Rubins told The Associated Press on Friday, Sept. 25 that she plans to cast her next vote from space – more than 200 miles above Earth. Rubins and two Russian cosmonauts are preparing for a mid-October launch to the International Space Station, where she’ll spend the next six months. (Andrey Shelepin/GCTC/NASA via AP) © NASA/GCTC/Andrey Shelepin This photo provided by NASA. Expedition 64 crew member NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, is seen during Soyuz qualification exams Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Rubins told The Associated Press on Friday, Sept. 25 that she plans to cast her next vote from space – more than 200 miles above Earth. Rubins and two Russian cosmonauts are preparing for a mid-October launch to the International Space Station, where she’ll spend the next six months. (Andrey Shelepin/GCTC/NASA via AP)

She will 'naut be sitting out this election.

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will vote from outer space in November, she told the Associated Press.

“I think it’s really important for everybody to vote,” Rubins told the AP. “If we can do it from space, then I believe folks can do it from the ground, too.”


Video: NASA astronaut plans to cast her ballot from space (Associated Press)

UP NEXT
UP NEXT

Rubins is scheduled to be floating 200 miles above Earth in the International Space Station for six months beginning in October, meaning she’ll need an absentee ballot to vote in November.

Thankfully for Rubins and other American astronauts who are not on the planet during election season, a 1997 Texas law allows them to vote from space. Most astronauts live in Houston.

For astronauts to vote, Mission Control sends a secure electronic ballot to the Space Station. The astronauts fill the ballot out and return it to Mission Control, which forwards it to the county clerk.

Rubins and fellow astronaut Shane Kimbrough also voted from space in 2016.

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from New York Daily News

New York Daily News
New York Daily News
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon