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SpaceX Starlink launch scrubbed due to high winds, now set to launch Thursday

CNET logo CNET 5/16/2019 Jackson Ryan
the tower of the city: falcon9iridium © CNET falcon9iridium

Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO, wants to bring speedy broadband to the world. Achieving that lofty goal relies on 60 satellites tucked neatly away inside a Falcon 9 payload bay. Now he's going to have to wait at least another 24 hours. 

The Starlink mission is set to deliver those first 60 internet satellites to orbit Thursday, after upper level winds delayed the original launch set for Wednesday evening. Starlink's successful launch will pave the way for a megaconstellation that will eventually contain over 12,000 of the miniature internet-providing beasts.

The launch window is now scheduled to open at 7:30 p.m. PT and close at 9 p.m. PT on May 16.

As is par for the course for SpaceX now, the company will attempt to land the Falcon 9 booster on a droneship known as "Of Course I Still Love You," floating along in the Atlantic Ocean. Around an hour into the mission, the satellites will be deployed.

If you're the kind of person who loves a spaceship and wants to watch along, you can follow live at the link below. SpaceX generally starts streaming around 15 minutes prior to launch (7:15 p.m. PT in this case).

Replay Video

The first 60 satellites will be dropped off at an altitude of approximately 270 miles (440 kilometers) above the Earth, if everything runs smoothly, and then they will gently propel themselves out to an orbit of about 340 miles (550 kilometers).

This will be the third time this particular Falcon 9 booster has ascended to space, according to SpaceX, with two previous flights coming in September 2018 and January 2019.

Musk has tried to temper expectations of this first, historic deployment of satellites, saying that "much will likely go wrong" and these first 60 satellites are a test, providing a demonstration of Starlink's future capabilities. Another six launches will be required before even "minor" coverage is offered.

You can read all about the Starlink plan for space internet domination in CNET's handy explainer.

Meet the SpaceX Falcon Heavy, the world's most powerful rocket

a close up of smoke: On Feb. 6, 2018, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy lifted off for the first time. It was a monumental moment for Elon Musk's private spaceflight company, after initially revealing the concept in 2011 and aiming for a 2013 launch. The historic feat heralded a new dawn for commercial spaceflight, with SpaceX showing it can put big payloads into orbit at a fraction of the price of other heavy lift vehicles and retrieve the rocket boosters! Here are some dazzling examples of just what the SpaceX Falcon Heavy can do -- and what it might do in the future.

On Feb. 6, 2018, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy lifted off for the first time. It was a monumental moment for Elon Musk's private spaceflight company, after initially revealing the concept in 2011 and aiming for a 2013 launch. The historic feat heralded a new dawn for commercial spaceflight, with SpaceX showing it can put big payloads into orbit at a fraction of the price of other heavy lift vehicles and retrieve the rocket boosters! Here are some dazzling examples of just what the SpaceX Falcon Heavy can do -- and what it might do in the future.
© Provided by CBS Interactive Inc.

Updated 7:50 p.m. PT: SpaceX has scrubbed today's launch.

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