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Hurricane Ian live updates: Florida death toll climbs

ABC News 10/1/2022
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The remnants of Ian are charging up the East Coast on Saturday after making landfall as a Category 1 hurricane in South Carolina on Friday afternoon.

The monster storm made its first U.S. landfall on Wednesday on Florida's west coast as a powerful Category 4 hurricane, shredding homes with ferocious winds topping 150 mph. Florida’s death toll has climbed to at least 52, according to information from local officials.

 

Latest Developments

Oct 1, 5:16 PM

Over 1,100 people rescued in Florida by National Guard

More than 1,100 Floridians have been rescued by the Florida National Guard in the wake of Hurricane Ian, according to state officials.

The rescues include 1,076 people evacuated from flooded areas in southwest and central Florida as of Saturday morning, as well as 78 people transported from a flooded nursing home facility, Gov. Ron DeSantis' office said in a press release.

 
Oct 1, 4:23 PM

Florida death toll climbs

Florida’s death toll from Hurricane Ian has climbed to at least 53, according to information from local officials.

Lee County, which encompasses Fort Myers, accounts for the majority of the fatalities, with at least 35 lives lost in the county, according to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office.

Part of a destroyed mobile home park is pictured in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. © Giorgio Viera/AFP via Getty Images Part of a destroyed mobile home park is pictured in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. An aerial image shows destroyed houses in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. © Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images An aerial image shows destroyed houses in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022.

Other fatalities were reported in Charlotte, Sarasota, Volusia, Lake, Collier and Manatee counties.

Despite the "complete devastation" in Lee County, Sheriff Carmine Marceno said Saturday that "there's light at the end of the tunnel. ... We are going to be stronger than ever."

"We are one big family together. That's what makes us great. And sometimes these horrific events bring us all together for us to move forward," Marceno said.

An aerial image shows the only access to the Matlacha neighborhood destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. © Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images An aerial image shows the only access to the Matlacha neighborhood destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. An aerial image shows the only access to the Matlacha neighborhood destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022. © Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images An aerial image shows the only access to the Matlacha neighborhood destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 30, 2022.

-ABC News’ Matt Foster

 
Oct 1, 4:30 PM

14-mile stretch of Florida's I-75 reopens after shutdown due to flooding river

The Florida Department of Transportation announced Saturday that it is reopening the 14-mile stretch of Interstate 75 that was shut down due to rising river water under the highway. Officials said the Myakka River's water levels had receded enough to safely reopen the highway.

But, officials warned they may have to shut down the interstate again if water levels rise once more.

Motorists are seen stalled on I-75 North bound on Septe. 30, 2022 in Punta Gorda, Fla. © Ivy Ceballo/Tampa Bay Times viaZUMA Press Motorists are seen stalled on I-75 North bound on Septe. 30, 2022 in Punta Gorda, Fla.

Officials had shut down I-75 from mile marker 179, near North Port and Toledo Blade Blvd. to mile marker 193, near Jacaranda Blvd, and long detours were in place.

I-75 is the main highway on the west coast of Florida and is a main route for travelers between Tampa-St. Petersburg and Fort Myers and Naples.

 
Oct 1, 4:11 PM

CDC tells healthcare professionals to be on alert for carbon monoxide poisoning

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put out a health advisory to healthcare professionals treating patients in areas affected by Hurricanes Fiona or Ian, telling them to maintain a high index of suspicion for carbon monoxide poisoning.

"Other people who may have been exposed to the same CO source may need to be identified and evaluated," the CDC said in a health advisory.

-ABC News' Eric Strauss

 
Oct 1, 4:10 PM

1.1 million without power in Florida

Over 1.1 million customers remain without power in Florida on Saturday, days after Hurricane Ian tore through the state.

Osceola County Sheriffs use a fanboat as they urge residents to leave the flooded Good Samaritan Society following Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Kissimmee, Fla. © Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images Osceola County Sheriffs use a fanboat as they urge residents to leave the flooded Good Samaritan Society following Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Kissimmee, Fla. Homes and businesses are flooded from the rising waters of the Peace River after Hurricane Ian, on Sept. 30, 2022, in Arcadia, Fla. © Crystal Vander Weit-USA Today Network Homes and businesses are flooded from the rising waters of the Peace River after Hurricane Ian, on Sept. 30, 2022, in Arcadia, Fla.

Another 145,000 customers are without power in North Carolina and more than 38,000 are in the dark in Virginia as Ian moves north.

A motorist drives though high water, as another turns around during the effects from Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Charleston, S.C. © Alex Brandon/AP A motorist drives though high water, as another turns around during the effects from Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Charleston, S.C.
 
Oct 1, 3:06 PM

North Carolina reports 4 deaths due to Ian

Four people have died in North Carolina since Friday in storm-related incidents, state officials said Saturday.

Two people died due to car accidents caused by storm conditions, one man drowned in his car and a fourth man died due to carbon monoxide poisoning from a generator.

Among those killed was a 25-year-old man who lost control of his vehicle and hydroplaned into another vehicle, a 24-year-old woman whose vehicle went off a wet road and struck a tree and a 22-year-old man who drowned when his truck left the roadway and submerged in a flooded swamp.

A 65-year-old man died Saturday from carbon monoxide poisoning from a generator running in his closed garage while the power was out. His wife was hospitalized.

“The storm has passed, but many hazards remain with downed trees, downed power lines and power outages,” said North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper in a press release. “We mourn with the families of those who have died and urge everyone to be cautious while cleaning up to avoid more deaths or injuries.”

 
Oct 1, 1:44 PM

Rain pushes north

A flood watch remains in effect in parts of Virginia and West Virginia on Saturday as Ian’s remnants push north.

The storm is significantly weakened, but winds may still top 35 mph as rain covers the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast this weekend.

-ABC News’ Daniel Amarante

 
Oct 1, 1:06 PM

No fatalities reported in South Carolina

Ian, the first hurricane to make landfall in South Carolina since Matthew in 2016, has not caused any deaths in South Carolina, Gov. Henry McMaster said Saturday.

Wind gusts, blowing down King Street, twist umbrellas during Hurricane Ian, in Charleston, S.C., on Sept. 30, 2022. © Grace Beahm Alford/AP Wind gusts, blowing down King Street, twist umbrellas during Hurricane Ian, in Charleston, S.C., on Sept. 30, 2022.

“Another good story for South Carolina, and we’re open for business,” he said at a news conference.

Ian barreled through South Carolina on Friday. The hardest-hit areas were along the coast from Charleston to Horry County, said Kim Stenson, director of the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. Charleston saw 6 to 8 inches of rain.

A child runs under a fallen tree from the effects from Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Charleston, S.C. © Alex Brandon/AP A child runs under a fallen tree from the effects from Hurricane Ian, Sept. 30, 2022, in Charleston, S.C. Flood waters cover the street of the South Battery in Charleston, S.C., during Hurricane Ian on Sept. 30, 2022. © Brad Nettles/AP Flood waters cover the street of the South Battery in Charleston, S.C., during Hurricane Ian on Sept. 30, 2022.
 
Oct 1, 7:26 AM

Remnants of Ian head to mid-Atlantic, Northeast

The remnants of Hurricane Ian, once a Category 4 hurricane that made multiple U.S. landfalls, are pushing up the mid-Atlantic and bringing widespread rain from Virginia to Connecticut.

Ian is now considered a post-tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph.

Flood watches are in effect in Virginia and West Virginia, where up to 6 inches of rain is expected through Saturday afternoon. A wind advisory is also in effect; gusts could reach 50 mph at higher elevations.

The rain will then continue to move north. Some of the Northeast coast, especially Delaware and Long Island, could see up to 6 inches of rain over the next 48 hours.

-ABC News’ Kenton Gewecke

 
Oct 1, 5:18 AM

Biden approves North Carolina emergency declaration

President Biden has declared that an emergency exists in North Carolina and ordered federal assistance to help with the state's response in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian.

"The President’s action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population," the White House said in a statement released early Saturday.

FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize and provide equipment and resources to help the recovery efforts on the ground.

"Deanne Criswell, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, named John F. Boyle as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected areas," said the White House."

Ian’s winds have come down to 50 mph as the storm continues to move north as a post-tropical cyclone.

Ian will continue to weaken as it moves north, and will bring heavy rainfall in short periods of time through the morning hours, prompting flood watches to be issued from North Carolina to West Virginia.

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