You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Metal monolith suddenly appears on top of California's Pine Mountain

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 12/3/2020 Matthew Wright For Dailymail.com
a sign in front of a mountain: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Tourist in California are flocking to yet another metal monolith that popped up on top of Pine Mountain, days after similar pillars in Romania and Utah were removed from their posts. 

Dozen of local hikers made the trek to the top of the mountain in Atascadero to snap a photo with the pillar, which mysteriously showed up on Wednesday. 

The obelisk appears to be made out of stainless steel, welded together at each of its three corners and using rivets that are attached to the side panels. It stands at 10ft tall and 18inches wide, the Atascadero News reports. 

a sign on a dirt field: A moveable monolith has popped up at Pine Mountain in Atascadero, California, on Wednesday

A moveable monolith has popped up at Pine Mountain in Atascadero, California, on Wednesday
© Provided by Daily Mail

The monolith at Pine Mountain is not attached to the ground, different from the one in Utah. It is estimated to weigh 200lbs, making it easy to push over. 

The City of Atascadero is aware of the object's existence but it is unknown what will come of it.  

It is the only remaining mystery monolith as ones in Romania and a Utah desert have already been removed after their brief stints of notoriety. 

On Tuesday, images emerged of four men working in the dead of night to remove the strange, triangular pillar from the desert in Utah.

The City of Atascadero is aware of the object's existence but it is unknown what will come of it © Provided by Daily Mail The City of Atascadero is aware of the object's existence but it is unknown what will come of it a stone building that has a rocky cliff: The mysterious triangular metal monolith that appeared in the remote Utah desert on November 18 and captured the attention of the nation vanished on Friday © Provided by Daily Mail The mysterious triangular metal monolith that appeared in the remote Utah desert on November 18 and captured the attention of the nation vanished on Friday

The shiny pillar, which protruded some 12 feet from the red rocks of southern Utah, was first spotted on November 18 by baffled local officials counting bighorn sheep from the air.  

Photographer Ross Bernards, who visited the monolith Friday, described in an Instagram post accompanying the photos how four men suddenly appeared that night, pushed the object over and dismantled it before carrying it off in a wheelbarrow.


Video: Tour Guide Claims to Have Taken Down Monolith in Utah to Keep Crowds Away (Inside Edition)

Tour Guide Claims to Have Taken Down Monolith in Utah to Keep Crowds Away
UP NEXT
UP NEXT

'One of them looked back at us all and said "Leave no trace." That was at 8:48,' wrote Bernards.

a group of people standing around a fire: PICTURED: Three of the four culprits responsible for toppling and removing the mysterious Utah monolith on Friday night © Provided by Daily Mail PICTURED: Three of the four culprits responsible for toppling and removing the mysterious Utah monolith on Friday night a canyon with a mountain in the background: The monolith on November 27 just moments before it would be taken down by the group of four © Provided by Daily Mail The monolith on November 27 just moments before it would be taken down by the group of four

 Sylvan Christensen has identified himself on Instagram as one of the four men responsible for removing the shiny 12-foot pillar on Friday, which was first spotted near to Canyonlands National Park on November 18 by officials from the Utah Department of Public Safety.

In a video posted to his personal page on Tuesday, Christensen and three others are seen strapping the structure to a wheelbarrow and taking it away from the canyon.

'The safe word is run,' one of the men is heard joking in the video as the group cart the monolith away. 

The short clip, which has already been viewed over 100,000 times on TikTok, was captioned: 'Don’t abandon your personal property on public land if you don’t want it to be taken out #utahmonolith #leavenotrace,' accompanied with a shrugging emoji. 

News of the Utah pillar's initial discovery quickly went viral around the world, with many noting the object's similarity with strange alien monoliths that trigger huge leaps in human progress in Stanley Kubrick's classic sci-fi film '2001: A Space Odyssey.' 

Some observers pointed out the object's resemblance to the avant-garde work of John McCracken, a US artist who lived for a time in nearby New Mexico and died in 2011.

But McCracken's representatives have given ambiguous and at times conflicting responses to this theory, prolonging an international guessing game that intensified further with the monolith's sudden removal Friday.

a sign on a grassy hill: In northern Romania, the shiny triangular pillar was found on Batca Doamnei Hill in the city of Piatra Neamt last Thursday © Provided by Daily Mail In northern Romania, the shiny triangular pillar was found on Batca Doamnei Hill in the city of Piatra Neamt last Thursday map © Provided by Daily Mail

A shiny monolith vanished on Tuesday from Romania's mountainous Neamt county, four days after its sudden appearance close to an ancient Dacian fortress.

'The 2.8 meter (9ft) tall structure disappeared overnight as quietly as it was erected last week,' journalist Robert Iosub of the Ziar Piatra Neamt local newspaper, who had seen the structure, told Reuters.

'An unidentified person, apparently a bad local welder, made it ... now all that remains is just a small hole covered by rocky soil,' local reporters had discovered, he said.

The sheet metal structure had a badly-welded join, he added.

A spokeswoman for Piatra Neamt police, Georgiana Mosu, said officers are conducting an inquiry into the illegally-installed structure, which was positioned in a protected archaeological area from November 27. 

a large green field with trees in the background: The mysterious monolith in Romania has also been removed already © Provided by Daily Mail The mysterious monolith in Romania has also been removed already

Sylvan Christensen: Full Statement to DailyMail.com 

We removed the Utah Monolith because there are clear precedents for how we share and standardize the use of our public lands, natural wildlife, native plants, fresh water sources, and human impacts upon them. The mystery was the infatuation and we want to use this time to unite people behind the real issues here— we are losing our public lands— things like this don’t help.

Let’s be clear: The dismantling of the Utah Monolith is tragic— and if you think we’re proud— we’re not. We’re disappointed. Furthermore, we were too late. We want to make clear that we support art and artists, but legality and ethics have defined standards-- especially here in the desert— and absolutely so in adventuring. The ethical failures of the artist for the 24” equilateral gouge in the sandstone from the erecting of the Utah Monolith, was not even close to the damage caused by the internet sensationalism and subsequent reaction from the world.

This land wasn’t physically prepared for the population shift (especially during a pandemic).

People arrived by car, by bus, by van, helicopter, planes, trains, motorcycles and E-bikes and there isn’t even a parking lot. There aren’t bathrooms— and yes, pooping in the desert is a misdemeanor. There was a lot of that. There are no marked trails, no trash cans, and its not a user group area. There are no designated camp sites. Each and every user on public land is supposed to be aware of the importance and relevance of this information and the laws associated with them. Because if you did, anyone going out there and filming the monolith and monetizing it without properly permitting the use of the land— would know that’s an offense too.

BLM currently has a huge job of managing millions of acres of land and millions of users using them. BLM already meets with so many active communities where we create and develop standards, usually learned from making mistakes. Leaders and business owners alike help designate user group areas that allow for certain uses of the public land in certain places. Some of them are permanent use like bike trails or jeep trails, some are semi-permanent like bolts and hangers. Some user group areas limit use like the Corona Arch Hiking user group area, that disallows roped activity, but allows hiking.

We encourage artists to create, land management to mange, and the community to take responsibility for their actions and property. What we need right now is a massive movement in the direction towards education of use and management of our lands— not a distraction from it.

Read more
AdChoices
AdChoices

More From Daily Mail

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon