You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Top Stories

Opinion: Why Floyd Mayweather's comeback is about more than just money

USA TODAY SPORTS logo USA TODAY SPORTS 11/22/2019 Josh Peter, USA TODAY
Floyd Mayweather Jr. et al. standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Floyd Mayweather says he's coming out of retirement -- again. © Mark J. Rebilas, USA TODAY Sports Floyd Mayweather says he's coming out of retirement -- again.

Jet fuel ain’t cheap these days.

Servicing Bugattis is pricey, too.

So it’s fair to speculate that Floyd Mayweather’s purported comeback, as announced by the 42-year-old boxer on his Instagram account Thursday night, is about $99.99.

From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day.

Or whatever it is he’s going to charge boxing fans for the pay-per-view fee for his next fight.

Because whether he fights Manny Pacquiao, or UFC star Khabib Nurmagomedov, or Conor McGregor or a fighter TBA, Floyd is going to ask you for more money than you want to spend — and, in the name of P.T. Barnum, you’re going to pay it.

Floyd will pad his 50-0 record and fatten his bank account.

Yet, this feels like more than about money.

It feels like the source of Floyd’s motivation is about something he craves almost as much as money — attention.

He has teased a comeback before with a possible rematch against Pacquiao. As a co-promoter, he has mugged for the cameras at other fights as if unable to resist the limelight. And he has made this announcement on the eve of Deontay Wilder’s fight against Luis Ortiz Saturday night in Las Vegas.

For the record, Mayweather is co-promoting Wilder-Ortiz rematch, and you can be sure he’ll be easy to find — and, if not available to answer any questions, available for the TV cameras or for a wave at the potential pay-per-view customers, er, fans.

In Mayweather's last fight, against McGregor in August 2017, and his bout against Pacquiao in May 2015, he appeared to have as much fun outside of the ring as inside of the ring. His PR skills grew to match his Hall-of-Fame boxing skills. And his chances to enjoy both maybe closing fast.

In February, he turns 43. And even though he has prided himself on supreme conditioning, his style depends on super-quick reflexes and stamina. The window of assurance that he has both is closing fast.

Maybe someone else who loves money and the spotlight as much as Floyd understands what this is all about more than others. On Instagram Thursday night, Floyd posted a photo of himself sitting next to UFC president Dana White at the Boston Celtics game, suggesting they could be pairing up to making hundreds of millions of dollars together and all the while enjoying the spotlight.

The highlight of it all for Floyd will be the walk to the ring — followed by the drive to the bank.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Opinion: Why Floyd Mayweather's comeback is about more than just money

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from USA Today Sports

USA TODAY SPORTS
USA TODAY SPORTS
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon