You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Top Stories

Why Jerry Jones turned down an offer to sell Cowboys and start a franchise in LA

Tribune News Service logo Tribune News Service 11/21/2018 By Clarence E. Hill Jr., Fort Worth Star-Telegram

a person standing in front of a crowd: Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank, left, and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones greet each other before a game on November 18, 2018, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. © Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution/TNS Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank, left, and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones greet each other before a game on November 18, 2018, at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. FRISCO, Texas - Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has always been prone to hyperbole when supporting something near and dear to him. 

Case in point, before the Cowboys' 22-19 victory against the Atlanta Falcons last Sunday he said that he wouldn't trade quarterback Dak Prescott for two first-round picks.

He also recently told Bloomberg that he wouldn't sell the Cowboys, who are worth an estimated $5 billion by Forbes Magazine, for $10 billion.

Jones reinforced that sentiment on his radio show on 105.3 The Fan Tuesday morning and said he wouldn't sell the Cowboys for "no amount of money" because of what the franchise means to him and his family.

"The best way to put this as far as on a personal basis, the value of the team, I would trade that perception of that number for the right number of first downs in a New York minute, or the right number of wins, or an opportunity to get to a Super Bowl," Jones said. "The point is it's not for sale. Fortunately, it won't be for sale. My immediate family, Charlotte (Jones Anderson), Stephen (Jones), and Jerry (Jones Jr.), they'll have it long after I'm gone. That's just a fact. And, so, it's just that. It's a feel-good for people to appreciate the value, but only to the extent that it helps first downs, that's all it counts for because the unit you use that value in commerce because they know they can't get to it. There's no amount of money that would get the Cowboys."

Even more interesting is that Jones said he turned down an offer to sell the Cowboys and start a new franchise in Los Angeles. He said the Cowboys and the Dallas-Fort Worth area were too important to him because of everything associated with the team and football.

"Several years back, I was approached by several owners that asked if I would consider selling the team, and the team being a more elite team and I take Los Angeles and build Los Angeles," Jones said. "That was not interesting for me, first of all, from a standpoint of where you are. I could go out and spend my lifetime building a new franchise in a market like Los Angeles and still be 50, 60 years behind the Dallas Cowboys who are out in front. So, that didn't make any sense. But I was born in Los Angeles. That is an attractive part of the world out there. But there is no place, no place is like our area for football and sport.

"We are in the best place in the world for American football. It's right here in Dallas, Texas. That's shown by the interest there is in the high school football, which is something completely different relative to the social and the cultural aspect of it, but then our support of the college game and then of course of the Dallas Cowboys. There's no place like this. This is the best place in the world for football."

Regarding the $10 billion price he said in the initial report, Jones believes that is a realistic number of what the team would be worth.

"I certainly think you can justify a $10 billion value, but economically, I'd rather have the Cowboys than the $10 billion," he said.

Visit the Fort Worth Star-Telegram at www.star-telegram.com

AdChoices
AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon